DNA Links Longtime Suspect Albert DeSalvo To Boston Strangler Victim

AP
Views

Photo: This Feb. 25, 1967, file photo shows self-confessed Boston Strangler Albert DeSalvo minutes after his capture in Boston. DeSalvo confessed to the string of 1960s killings but was never convicted. He died in prison in the 1970s.

BOSTON (AP) — A Massachusetts prosecutor says advances in DNA technology have allowed investigators to link longtime suspect Albert DeSalvo to the last of the 1960s slayings attributed to the Boston Strangler.Nineteen-year-old Mary Sullivan was found strangled in her Boston apartment in January 1964. She was the last of 11 women whose deaths were attributed to the Boston Strangler and the only victim for which DNA evidence is available.

The announcement represents the most definitive evidence yet linking DeSalvo to the case. He confessed to the killings but was never convicted. He was sentenced to life in prison on other charges and was stabbed to death there in 1973.

Suffolk District Attorney Daniel Conley says the DNA produced a “familial match” with DeSalvo. His remains are being exhumed and Conley says he expects an exact match.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK