UN Calls Out US Police For Excessive Use Of Force Against Minorities

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A UN committee said Friday that the United States should stop directing the use of excessive police force at American minorities, according to a Reuters report.

The recommendation comes in the wake of the recent fatal police shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., which has led to civil unrest and clashes between protestors and police.

The U.N.’s Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) reviewed America’s treatment of minorities and found that minorities, in particular African Americans, are discriminated against, Reuters reported.

According to Reuters, Noureddine Amir, the committee’s vice chairman, told reporters, “Racial and ethnic discrimination remains a serious and persistent problem in all areas of life from de facto school segregation, access to health care and housing.”

Amir also said:

“The excessive use of force by law enforcement officials against racial and ethnic minorities is an ongoing issue of concern and particularly in light of the shooting of Michael Brown. … This is not an isolated event and illustrates a bigger problem in the United States, such as racial bias among law enforcement officials, the lack of proper implementation of rules and regulations governing the use of force, and the inadequacy of training of law enforcement officials.”

A panel of 18 experts interviewed a U.S. delegation as part of its review of racial issues in America, according to Reuters. The panel took particular issue with the U.S.’s “Stand Your Ground” laws, which it said should be reviewed to “remove far-reaching immunity and ensure strict adherence to principles of necessity and proportionality when deadly force is used for self-defense.”

U.S. Ambassador Keith Harper admitted to the panel that the United States has “much left to do.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ahiza Garcia is a newswriter based in New York City. Before joining TPM, Ahiza interned and freelanced for Nightline, Fox Sports, and ESPN the Magazine. She holds a B.A. in psychology from Columbia University and an M.S. in digital journalism from Syracuse University. She can be reached at ahiza@talkingpointsmemo.com.
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