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O'Reilly And Hume Talk About How Much Obama Has Benefitted From Being Black (VIDEO)

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Hume made the comments a day after he appeared on an all-white panel on "Fox News Sunday" and accused President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder of using race as "a shield and a sword." After the appearance, he said, people on Twitter accused him of racism and bemoaned the lack of diversity on the panel.

“In other words, in order to discuss this, you have to have an African-American present,” Hume complained to O'Reilly. “But if you’re just white, then discussing this is racist.”

Hume didn't need to defend himself to O'Reilly, who's been on a crusade against the "grievance industry."

The "grievance industry," as O'Reilly explained last week, "basically says that America is not a fair nation, that the deck is stacked against minorities, women, the poor, gays, atheists, Muslims — you name it."

He told Hume on Monday that, far from being discriminated against, Obama has benefitted from his race.

"You know, it's -- this is a tough question to pose. But if Barack Obama had been a young white senator from Illinois, I think probably Hillary Clinton would have defeated him. Is that unfair to say?" O'Reilly asked.

Hume agreed and said that Obama has received the "benefit of the doubt" more than he would have if he were white. And he said that the march toward equality produced an unfortunate trend.

"Look, one of the effects the great success of the Civil Rights movement, which was certainly a just cause, was that overwhelmingly Americans agree that blacks and other minorities should be treated equally in this country, they want to see blacks get ahead, and the effect of that is that being called a racist or labeled a racist, particularly if it's successful, is one of the worst things that can happen to you in America," Hume said.

"So it places a real weapon in the hands of those who would use it, particularly of those who would use it unscrupulously, which I think we've seen in the cases of some."