How Cutting-Edge Technology & Science Are Powering The Future TPM Idealab

WASHINGTON (AP) — In 2025, self-driving cars could be the norm, people could have more leisure time and goods could become cheaper. Or, there could be chronic unemployment and an even wider income gap, human interaction could become a luxury and the wealthy could live in walled cities with robots serving as labor.

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FAIRFIELD, Texas (AP) — As murky water snakes through a man-made wetland between Dallas and Houston, its shallow ponds of lush vegetation slowly filter out phosphorous and nitrates until, a week later, the water runs clear as a creek into the area drinking supply.

The 2,000-acre wetland system in Fairfield converts what is mainly treated wastewater that would otherwise flow into the Gulf of Mexico into an additional 65,000 gallons per day feeding the Richland-Chambers Reservoir — a significant contribution in a state enduring prolonged drought.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — NASA plans to make oxygen — a key ingredient of rocket fuel — on Mars early next decade.

Space agency officials unveiled seven instruments they plan to put on a Martian rover that would launch in 2020, including two devices aimed at bigger future Mars missions.

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Doctors this month detected HIV in a Mississippi child, now nearly 4 years old, who had been seemingly cured of the virus last year.

The child was born with HIV and underwent antiretroviral therapy for the first 18 months of her life. Her mother did not bring the child back for treatment for five months; when doctors tested her again, they did not find detectable HIV, leading them to believe the 18 months of treatment could be effective permanently. For more than two years, doctors did not detect HIV in the child leading to stories that the child was "cured." Now, doctors say, that is not the case.

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — Five years after a NASA satellite to track carbon dioxide plunged into the ocean after liftoff, the space agency is launching a carbon copy — this time on a different rocket.

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — Five years after a NASA satellite to track carbon dioxide plunged into the ocean after liftoff, the space agency is launching a carbon copy — this time on a different rocket.

The $468 million mission is designed to study the main driver of climate change emitted from smokestacks and tailpipes. Some of the carbon dioxide is sucked up by trees and oceans, and the rest is lofted into the atmosphere, trapping the sun's heat and warming the planet.

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — NASA has tested new technology designed to bring spacecraft — and one day even astronauts — safely down to Mars, with the agency declaring the experiment a qualified success even though a giant parachute got tangled on the way down.

Saturday's $150 million experiment is the first of three involving the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator vehicle. Tests are being conducted at high altitude on Earth to mimic descent through the thin atmosphere of the Red Planet.

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