In it, but not of it. TPM DC

This post has been updated to clarify the survey's findings.

How is this possible? More than one-third of people who are still uninsured under Obamacare -- but appear to be eligible for coverage and sought it out -- were told that they were not eligible for health insurance under the law, according to a new report.

The finding, from a survey of 10,500 uninsured Americans by the non-profit Kaiser Family Foundation, is truly perplexing. If you extrapolate out to the overall uninsured population in the United States, it means that more than two million people who by the letter of the law should be covered were told that they weren't qualified.

"I've got no possible explanation for you," Caroline Pearson, vice president of Avalere Health, an independent consulting firm and a top expert on health policy, told TPM. That's a bit of an exaggeration -- she and others had some educated guesses -- but it's not that far off.

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Republicans have signaled they want to force a fight over Social Security in the coming Congress and, almost immediately, Democrats have pulled out their big gun in the public debate over the program: privatization.

The House passed a rule earlier this month that blocked a transfer of tax revenues from the retirement to disability funds, the latter of which will start being unable to pay full benefits to its 11 million beneficiaries in late 2016. They were clear that they wanted to force a debate, with conservative wonks hoping they would use it to change Social Security as a whole, as Democrats have also warned they might.

So Democrats almost immediately started to use the 'P' word, which is a powerful political tool. President George W. Bush's 2005 plan to privatize Social Security turned into a political disaster after Democrats eventually coalesced around a clear, direct anti-privatization message, and the specter of privatization maintains rhetorical potency.

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Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R) agreed to expand Medicaid under Obamacare Tuesday, but you'd be forgiven for not catching that if you actually listened to what he had to say.

"I believe Medicaid is not a program we should expand. It's a program that we should reform," Pence said. "That's exactly what we're accomplishing."

His office didn't mention the Affordable Care Act when announcing the plan, which will cover up to 350,000 low-income Indianans. When Pence's PR team tweeted a timeline of the state program being used to expand Medicaid in that state, they skipped over the 2010 passage of Obamacare. But Pence has accepted Medicaid expansion dollars authorized by Obamacare to pay for this alternative plan -- which the Obama administration had to approve.

An Obama administration official had actually primed TPM to be ready for Pence's semantical theatrics. That's because it's become the norm. More Republican-led states are signing onto the key Obamacare program, but they are very reluctant to call it that.

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Democrats are giving Senate Republicans a taste of their own medicine.

The new minority is pulling out all the stops to stymie Sen. Mitch McConnell's first bill as majority leader — legislation to approve the Keystone XL pipeline, which faces a veto threat from President Barack Obama.

And in a possible sign of trouble to come for the Kentucky Republican, Democrats are having some success — even though plenty of their own members support the pipeline. A vote to end debate on the legislation failed on Monday afternoon, 53-39, falling short of the 60 votes required to defeat a filibuster.

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