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TPMDC Morning Roundup

Geithner At House Committee Again Today, Making Case For New Reforms
Tim Geithner will be testifying at a 10 a.m. ET hearing of the House Financial Services Committee, at which he will be making the case for a new regulatory reform package. The new proposals would reportedly regulate the market for credit default swaps, and require hedge funds to register with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and empower the government to take over non-bank financial institutions in order to prevent collapse.

Biden's Day Ahead: Stimulus Implementation, International Diplomacy
Vice President Biden is holding a 10:45 a.m. ET meeting on stimulus implementation, with cabinet members and representatives of the relevant agencies. He will then travel to Chile and Costa Rica, to meet with Latin American leaders on the upcoming Summit of the Americas in April. In Chile, he will attend the Progressive Governance conference, along with the the presidents and prime ministers of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Norway, the United Kingdom and Uruguay. In Costa Rica, he will meet with President Oscar Arias.

Rove: Obama Making Tax And Spending Issues Relevant Again
In his latest Wall Street Journal column, Karl Rove blasts President Obama for running up large deficits. "Suddenly, though, it doesn't seem like a time of new politics and new concerns," says Rove. "Many Americans are anxious -- and in some cases angry -- about a set of old issues: deficits, taxes and the national debt."

Report: Some Congressional Liberals Feeling Slighted
Roll Call reports that some Congressional liberals are irritated that President Obama hasn't yet met with them, despite having previous face time with all the other ideological groups within the Democratic Party, and even with the Republicans. Said. Rep. Lynn Woolsey (D-CA): "Maybe they think that they can take us for granted, but they can't."

Nevada Governor Changes Course, Will Take Stimulus Money
Gov. Jim Gibbons (R-NV), who had been threatening to refuse $77 million in stimulus money meant for unemployment benefits, has now backed down and will take the money in the face of a likely override from the legislature. In a statement, Gibbons said: "We have the responsibility to do everything we can to help our unemployed workers get through these difficult times, even if that means passing legislation that we would not necessarily approve during prosperous times."