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Paula Deen On Her Dream 'Southern Plantation Wedding'

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AP Photo / Carlo Allegri

Deen's deposition in the lawsuit was first reported by the National Enquirer.

A copy of the deposition transcript is published below.

Deen, her brother Earl "Bubba" Hiers, her company, and the corporations that operate a pair of restaurants she owns in Savannah, Ga., are being sued by former employee Lisa Jackson. A complaint filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Georgia by Jackson's attorney, Matthew Billips, last November alleged she was subjected to "violent, sexist, and racist behavior" during five years working for Deen's various businesses.

According to the complaint, Jackson began working for Uncle Bubba's Oyster House, a restaurant run by Hiers, in early 2005 and left in August 2010 due to the inappropriate behavior she said she was subjected to in her time there. In the deposition, Deen said she owns half of the corporation that operates Uncle Bubba's Oyster House. Jackson also said she did some other work for Deen's company and a restaurant she runs. The complaint alleged "racially discriminatory attitudes pervade" Uncle Bubba's Oyster House where Jackson claimed African-American employees were required to use separate bathrooms and entrances from white staffers. Jackson also said African-Americans were held to "different, more stringent, standards" than whites at the restaurant and that Hiers regularly made offensive racial remarks. In the complaint, Jackson is described as a "white female." However the complaint noted she has biracial nieces, so "derogatory remarks regarding African Americans are even more personally offensive to Ms. Jackson than they would be to another white citizen."

Along with the allegations of racism, Jackson's complaint accuses Hiers of making inappropriate sexual comments and forcing her to look at pornography with him. The complaint also said Hiers violently shook employees on multiple occasions and came to work in an "almost constant state of intoxication."

Jackson's complaint also accuses Deen of racism and enabling Hiers' behavior. According to the complaint, Deen and other managers at her companies ignored Jackson's attempts to discuss Hiers' behavior. As evidence that Deen "holds such racist views herself," the complaint details an incident that occurred when Jackson was in charge of "food and serving arrangements" at Hier's wedding in 2007. The complaint includes a comment Deen allegedly made when asked by Jackson what type of uniforms the servers should wear at the wedding.

"Well what I would really like is a bunch of little niggers to wear long-sleeve white shirts, black shorts and black bow ties, you know in the Shirley Temple days, they used to tap dance around," the lawsuit claims Deen said. "Now that would be a true southern wedding, wouldn't it? But we can't do that because the media would be on me about that."

In her deposition, which was given last month, Deen denied many of the allegations against Hiers and addressed the alleged comment about his wedding. Deen said she remembered telling Jackson and another employee about a restaurant she went to with an exclusively African-American waitstaff that she wanted to emulate, but was worried about the potential reaction. Though Deen admitted to using the phrase "really southern plantation wedding" she denied having said the N word.

"I remember telling them about a restaurant that my husband and I had recently visited. And I'm wanting to think it was in Tennessee or North Carolina or somewhere, and it was so impressive," Deen said. "The whole entire wait staff was middle-aged black men, and they had on beautiful white jackets with a black bow tie. I mean, it was really impressive. And I remember saying I would love to have servers like that, I said, but I would be afraid that somebody would misinterpret."

Deen said "that restaurant represented a certain era in America." When pressed by Billips, the plaintiff's lawyer, Deen said she was referring to the period immediately surrounding the Civil War. She also said she knew people might "read something into it" if she used exclusively African-American servers at the wedding.

Though she denied having used the N word when discussing the wedding waitstaff, Deen admitted to Billips that she used the term in the past.

"Yes, of course," Deen replied when asked if she ever said the word.

Deen said she employed the term when telling her husband about an incident "when a black man burst into the bank that I was working at and put a gun to my head."

"I didn't feel real favorable towards him," Deen said of the alleged bank robber.

Deen also admitted she was "sure" that she'd used the word since that incident. Specifically, Deen said she "probably" used the word while "repeating" a "conversation between blacks." She also said that her family, including Hiers, do not discriminate against any race and object to the N word "being used in any cruel or mean behavior." Jackson's attorney responded by asking Deen to explain how the N word might be used in a "non-mean way."

"We hear a lot of things in the kitchen, things that they -- that black people will say to each other," Deen said. "If we are relaying something that was said, a problem that we're discussing, that's not said in a mean way."

Billips also asked Deen whether she thought "jokes" containing the N word would be hurtful. Deen said she was unsure.

"That's kind of hard. Most -- most jokes are about Jewish people, rednecks, black folks. Most jokes target -- I don't know. I didn't make up the jokes, I don't know," said Deen. "They usually target, though, a group. Gays or straights, black, redneck, you know, I just don't know -- I just don't know what to say. I can't, myself, determine what offends another person."

Though she said she does not tell "racial" jokes herself, Deen said she was "sure" members of her family have told jokes that contained the N word and that her husband "is constantly telling me jokes." Billips asked whether Deen is "offended at all by those jokes."

"No, because it's my husband," she said.

"Contrary to media reports, Ms. Deen does not condone or find the use of racial epithets acceptable," Deen's attorney, William Franklin, told the Associated Press in a statement. A spokeswoman for the Food Network issued a statement saying it will "continue to monitor the situation."

Attorneys for Deen and Hiers did not respond to a request for comment from TPM. Billips declined to comment. In their filings in the lawuit, Deen and Hiers and the other defendants have denied Jackson's allegations.

Read Deen's full deposition below.

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About The Author

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Hunter Walker is a national affairs reporter for TPM. He came to the site in 2013 from the New York Observer. He has also written for New York Magazine, Gawker, the Village Voice, Forbes, The Daily, and Deadspin. He can be reached at hunter@talkingpointsmemo.com