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Driving A Hard Bargain: Nelson Says He Would've Opposed His Own Abortion Language

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Newscom

(The House's health care bill includes language, authored by Rep. Bart Stupak (D-MI), that would prevent anyone receiving federal insurance subsidies from buying comprehensive policies that cover abortion.)

When the House and Senate have passed two versions of legislation, negotiators from both chambers come together to iron out the differences. The resulting, final legislation can still be filibustered, though, and when that happens, Senate rules say the package must attract 60 votes. That threat, Nelson says, is what would have given him the power to insist on tougher abortion restrictions.

"There were a whole bunch of people who didn't like the Nelson language - they only went along with because I could be the 60th vote," Nelson said. "Leverage increases, exponentially, like the difference between a number 2 earthquake, 3 earthquake, 4 earthquake - goes up exponentially like that - your leverage goes like that at the very end."

Nelson isn't completely sure his gambit would have paid off, though. And he admits that, if he'd failed, he would have relented.

"I thought my language was good enough if we all failed - I still do," Nelson said. But the trick is not to let on. "I could have but I was going to say - and this was all the plan - that I would insist that it be" Stupak.

(H/T Wonkroom)

About The Author

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Brian Beutler is TPM's senior congressional reporter. Since 2009, he's led coverage of health care reform, Wall Street reform, taxes, the GOP budget, the government shutdown fight and the debt limit fight. He can be reached at brian@talkingpointsmemo.com