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Tierney Sneed

Tierney Sneed is a reporter for Talking Points Memo. She previously worked for U.S. News and World Report. She grew up in Florida and attended Georgetown University.

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Republican congressional leaders claim they are having a tough time cobbling together a back-up plan in case the Supreme Court invalidates Obamacare subsidies for millions of Americans thanks in no small part to the presidential aspirations among some in their flock.

“Corralling our presidentials on a plan or a solution is going to be a bit of a challenge,” Sen. John Thune (R-SD), the GOP's No. 3 in the Senate, told Politico. “Everyone is going to be running away from — lock, stock and barrel — any connection whatsoever to the current program.”

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Ahead of a potentially historic Supreme Court ruling, leading Republicans are vowing to defy any decision that sanctions same-sex marriage and are challenging the very legitimacy of the high court.

With a decision in Obergefell v. Hodges expected before the end of June, conservatives are confronted with what was only a few years ago a nearly unthinkable possibility: a Supreme Court decision that decisively makes same-sex marriage a constitutional right.

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About three-quarters of Republican state lawmakers who signed Grover Norquist’s notorious anti-tax pledge broke their promise not to raise taxes by approving a budget that will raise $384 million in tax revenue.

According to the tally of The Hutchinson News, only six of the state’s 53 lawmakers who have signed either Norquist’s Americans for Tax Reform pledge, or the Koch brothers-affiliated Americans for Prosperity pledge, voted against the recently-passed package. Fifteen of the 21 ATR-pledge signers approved of the Senate budget deal or its House version, which the group confirmed to TPM does not meet the standards of their anti-tax promise. Gov. Sam Brownback (R), who is expected to sign legislation, is not among the ATR pledge-signers.

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If Californians would like to see an end to the extreme drought the state is facing, they should consider passing more restrictions on abortion. That, at least, was the suggestion of a California assemblywomen in remarks to anti-abortion activists last week.

"Texas was in a long period of drought until Governor Perry signed the fetal pain bill,” state Assemblywoman Shannon Grove (R-Bakersfield) said, as reported by RH Reality Check. "It rained that night. Now God has His hold on California."

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If Mitt Romney holds any grudge against Sheldon Adelson for funding the GOP rivals who roiled his 2012 GOP presidential primary campaign, he isn’t showing it.

The failed GOP nominee and the Las Vegas casino magnate are teaming up to see that the 2016 presidential race is not a repeat of the 2012 campaign for Republicans. Politico reports that Romney and Adelson have joined forces to convince donors to rally behind the conservative White House contenders with broad appeal and stymie the sort of long-shot candidacies that wrought havoc in 2012.

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State lawmakers are struggling to come up with a contingency plan if the Supreme Court invalidates their federal Obamacare subsidies, according to a Washington Post op-ed by policy experts.

“Dozens of interviews conducted by our research team with political leaders, agency officials and advocacy organizations in those states indicate that the states are almost completely underprepared for the Supreme Court’s decision in [King v. Burwell],” wrote David K. Jones, an assistant professor at the Boston University School of Public Health, and Nicholas Bagley, an assistant professor of law at the University of Michigan.

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Add Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) to the list of conservatives resisting any plan that would temporarily extend Obamacare subsidies if the Supreme Court strikes them down later this month.

The 2016 GOP White House contender told Politico he would fight a Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY)-endorsed proposal to extend the subsidies through 2017, when Republicans hope a Republican president would be in office to push a comprehensive alternative to Obamacare.

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Legislation blocked by the North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory (R) allowing public authorities to opt-out of officiating same-sex marriages will become law, after the North Carolina House secured the necessary votes Thursday to override McCrory’s veto. Previously, the Senate had voted to do the same.

The legislation, known as Senate Bill 2, will allow magistrates and registers of deeds to decline to participate in any marriage -- not just same-sex ones -- if they object to the marriage on religious grounds. Critics say it will open the door to all sorts of discrimination, not just discrimination of gays and lesbians, given its vague language.

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The number of multiracial babies jumped by ten-fold over the last four decades, according to data in a new report from the Pew Research Center. The findings were derived from Census Bureau data and were contained in the new report released Thursday titled Multiracial in America. In 1970, only 1 percent of children under the age of 1 were multiracial. By 2013, 10 percent were.

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