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Josh Marshall

Josh Marshall is editor and publisher of TalkingPointsMemo.com.

Articles by Josh

No movement on the Ashcrometer today. Still holding steady at 75% chance of confirmation.

But did you notice how Judiciary Chairman Pat Leahy (one of the most underrated senators, in Talking Points' book) caught Ashcroft in a lie, and called him on it?

Sure, he didn't put it quite so baldly. But ... well, let me just get to the story.

The latest Republican angle is to frame the confirmation debate as though John Ashcroft's critics were saying that he either has the wrong religion (he's Pentecostal) or that he is too religious. So John Ashcroft becomes just one more potential victim in the on-going persecution of white Christian conservatives.

Here Orrin Hatch implies that some senators may be doing just that and Ashcroft responds with a self-serving, lametonian response.

HATCH: Doesn't matter to me whether you're Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, whatever, or an atheist or agnostic. I'm sure that goes for--I hope that I'm sure that that goes to the rest of our fellow senators. In fact, the Constitution of the United States specifically forbids religious qualifications for office.

Now, having gone through that type of, I think, offensive criticism, which is continuing right up to today, is there anything in your religious beliefs that would impair you from faithfully and fully fulfilling your responsibilities as attorney general of the United States?

ASHCROFT: Well, I don't believe it's appropriate to have a test based on one's religion for a job. I think Article V of the Constitution makes that clear.

Please!

A short time later Senator Leahy tried to clear up the libel Hatch had slipped into his remarks.

LEAHY: I just would not want to leave one of the questions from my friend from Utah to give the wrong impression to the people here and just, sort of, make it very clear. Have you heard any senator, Republican or Democrat, suggest that there should be a religious test on your confirmation?

ASHCROFT: No senator has said, "I will test you," but a number of senators have said, "Will your religion keep you from being able to perform your duties in office?"

LEAHY: I'm amazed at that.

ASHCROFT: Pardon?

LEAHY: Well, I'm amazed at that …

Yeah, me too.

You'd like to nudge down the Ashcrometer in honor of Martin Luther King Day. But it's not to be.

Today the Ashcrometer holds steady at 75% chance of confirmation.

P.S. Another update soon on the filibuster option.

Talking Points has been worried for some time about over-playing George W. Bush's militant provincialism and penchant for verbal gaffes. (Really. No kidding, he has.)

Can't this just be a dressed-up form of cultural or regional pretension? Liberals wasted no end of time harping on Ronald Reagan's lack of intellectual curiosity and culture.

And what good did it do them? Not much. At best it further alienated them from their one time base of support among middling working families in the Midwest and the Northeast. And to some extent with good reason.

Still, it's hard to ignore the signs that our new president is an imbecile.

On NBC's Dateline, Tom Brokaw asked Bush if any White House invitation to Scalia could be construed as some sort of payback for handing him the presidency. Here's how Reuters reported the conversation:

"I don't know," he replied. "I do like him. (But) I guess we're going to have to scratch him off the invitation list now," he replied to interviewer Tom Brokaw.

When his wife Laura Bush protested that it was perfectly normal for the president and first lady to host the Supreme Court, Bush interrupted, saying, "He just teasing..."

"He was just trying to make sure Anthony didn't get a good meal," Bush said, correcting himself quickly, "Antonio."

But neither name was quite right.

The first name of the man appointed to the Supreme Court in 1986 by former President Ronald Reagan is "Antonin."

Is this some sort of cultural jujitsu? Is he suckering us into looking like East Coast, elitist snobs?

Unfortunately, no big news today from the Sunday talk shows, so the Ashcrometer falls only a measly two points -- to a clean 75% chance of confirmation.

At the same time, all the Democratic Senators who were saying nice things about Ashcroft have fallen silent. And a number that have always been silent have all but decided to oppose him.

The Conventional Wisdom in Washington still leans overwhelmingly in Ashcroft's favor. But Ronnie White's testimony will throw a heavy dose of volatility and unpredictability into the mix. And polls have already shown real misgivings about Ashcroft's nomination. In other words, strong shifts in public opinion could change the calculus rapidly and dramatically.

The real question now is whether the Senate Democratic caucus is willing to kill Ashcroft's nomination with a filibuster (i.e., with forty votes).

Talking Points three Democratic senators to watch are Joe Lieberman, Max Cleland, and Evan Bayh. They'll tell the story.

More on why soon.

The New York Times Op-Ed page has not always been friendly territory for Bill Clinton (to put it mildly). But the editors' obligatory final summing-up of Clinton's tenure in office is fair-minded and insightful.

Also see the Washington Post's analytically and morally stunted take on Clinton's eight years in office.

So … you think Talking Points only does gimmicky things like the Ashcrometer, do you?

Well, he's got the high-brow thing goin' too! Here's his verdict on Jim Lehrer and the 2000 presidential debates in the new issue of the Columbia Journalism Review.

Look at this! A new feature! The Ashcrometer! Until this afternoon I was going to start the Ashcrometer at 85% chance of confirmation.

But then I saw this Newsweek Poll that says, by a small margin (41% to 37%), more Americans want Ashcroft rejected than confirmed. That and the Stuart Taylor article mentioned below bumped him down a bit. So for now the Ashcrometer stands at 77%.

The further south his nomination goes the more scrunched he gets.

P.S. More Ashcroftiana coming soon, more Ashcrometer updates!

P.P.S. Return later on Sunday for a post-Sunday chat show update of the Ashcrometer.

Talking Points was ready to cut Katherine Harris some slack. She's gotten knocked around a lot after all.

But what's with the with Austin Powers outfit?

Is that a cravat?

The text of John Ashcroft's speech at Bob Jones University was pretty disappointing if you were expecting any wacko fireworks.

Ashcroft wasn't guilty of any racially tinged remarks. But he was guilty of bad history. Ashcroft said the American colonists routinely told emissaries from King George III, "We have no king but Jesus" when they were asked to pay taxes.

Hmmmm...  Talking Points spent the better part of his twenties studying this stuff, and his verdict is: no, not a common revolutionary battle cry.

Where'd they get this guy from?

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