Texas’ Largest County Asks DOJ For Help As SB1 Causes Thousands Of Ballots To Be Rejected

Among 9,809 mail-in ballots received by Harris County, a whopping 35.5%, or 3,491 votes, have been flagged for rejection, county officials said.
AUSTIN, TX - OCTOBER 13: A poll worker stamps a voters ballot before dropping it into a secure box at a ballot drop off location on October 13, 2020 in Austin, Texas. The first day of voting saw voters waiting hours ... AUSTIN, TX - OCTOBER 13: A poll worker stamps a voters ballot before dropping it into a secure box at a ballot drop off location on October 13, 2020 in Austin, Texas. The first day of voting saw voters waiting hours in line to cast their votes. Gov. Greg Abbott announced earlier this year that he would expand early voting for the election beginning on Oct. 13. Mail in voting began on Oct. 8 and has been part of a legal battle after Gov. Abbott declared each county may only have 1 mail in ballot drop off center, the ruling was later struck down in federal court but then the decision was upheld when a stay was ruled in the overturning. (Photo by Sergio Flores/Getty Images) MORE LESS

Texas’ largest county has rejected thousands of absentee ballots and ballot applications due to Republicans’ restrictive new voting law — and now, officials there have asked the Department of Justice for help. 

The new law, SB1, is “achieving exactly what its authors set out to do: erect more hurdles in front of the ballot box and systematically suppress the vote in Harris County,” wrote the county judge, county attorney and county elections administrator in a letter to Attorney General Merrick Garland flagged Thursday by Houston Public Media. 

Harris County, home to Houston, has for weeks sounded the alarm about early warning signs that SB1 is resulting in unusually large rates of rejected ballot applications.

The trouble comes from Republicans’ new ID requirements for people eligible to vote by mail: The form of that required ID number (whether a driver’s license number, the last four digits of a Social Security number, or state ID number) must match what the voter used to register with the state, sometimes decades earlier. Previously, absentee voters’ identities were confirmed by comparing their signatures to government records. 

The results speak for themselves: Out of 33,270 mail ballot applications received by Harris County as of Feb. 15, 14% were flagged for rejection due to SB1’s new voter ID requirements, according to the county officials’ letter. And among 9,809 ballots received by the county by that date, a whopping 35.5%, or 3,491 votes, have been flagged for rejection for the same reason. 

Voters can cure these rejections, but it’s unclear how many will be able to do so in time to be counted for Texas’ March 1 primary election. 

The letter also flagged the design of ballot envelopes, saying that SB1 is “forcing voters into a game of gotcha by hiding a section of required personal information under the flap of the required voting envelope.” 

“Our message today is simple,” the county officials wrote to the attorney general, who is currently overseeing a federal lawsuit against Texas over parts of SB1. “Please exhaust every legal option available to ensure that each eligible voter in Harris County and the State of Texas has their vote counted. No action is too small to preserve our democracy.” 

Dear Reader,

When we asked recently what makes TPM different from other outlets, readers cited factors like honesty, curiosity, transparency, and our vibrant community. They also pointed to our ability to report on important stories and trends long before they are picked up by mainstream outlets; our ability to contextualize information within the arc of history; and our focus on the real-world consequences of the news.

Our unique approach to reporting and presenting the news, however, wouldn’t be possible without our readers’ support. That’s not just marketing speak, it’s true: our work would literally not be possible without readers deciding to become members. Not only does member support account for more than 80% of TPM’s revenue, our members have helped us build an engaged and informed community. Many of our best stories were born from reader tips and valuable member feedback.

We do what other news outlets can’t or won’t do because our members’ support gives us real independence.

If you enjoy reading TPM and value what we do, become a member today.

Latest News
Comments
Masthead Masthead
Founder & Editor-in-Chief:
Executive Editor:
Managing Editor:
Associate Editor:
Investigations Desk:
Reporters:
Newswriters:
Director of Audience:
Editor at Large:
General Counsel:
Publisher:
Head of Product:
Director of Technology:
Associate Publisher:
Front End Developer:
Senior Designer: