Kinzinger: Jan. 6 Committee Fully Expects Giuliani’s Cooperation Amid Reported Talks

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani speaks during a news conference in Miami in July 2021. (Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL), who serves on the Jan. 6 Select Committee, on Sunday said that the panel “fully” expects Rudy Giuliani to comply with its subpoena. Kinzinger’s remarks come a day after the New York Times reported that Giuliani is in talks with the committee to testify.

Appearing on CBS, Kinzinger said the committee expects Giuliani to cooperate “because that’s the law,” citing Giuliani’s subpoena alongside those issued to other key players in Trump’s orbit last month.

“There may be some changes and dates and moments here as, you know, lawyers do their back and forth,” Kinzinger said. “But we fully expect that in accordance with the law, we’ll hear from Rudy.”

Kinzinger added that regardless of when the committee hears from Giuliani, or the length of his interview, the panel is receiving “a lot of information.”

“We’re looking forward to wrapping this up at some point when that is right, showing it to the American people, but not rushing it, not hurrying this,” Kinzinger said. “We want everybody to have the full story. That’s what’s important.”

Kinzinger went on to reiterate the committee’s plans to begin holding public hearings in the spring.

“I think spring or summer and in that timeframe is the hope — basically, we’ll will want to be able to take this information and present it to the American people, not just in a report, which is going to be essential, but in people, in faces and in stories,” Kinzinger said.

On Saturday, the Times reported on Giuliani’s discussions with the committee about testifying. The Times notes that it’s unclear what Giuliani might provide and that negotiations are ongoing.

Giuliani’s lawyer reportedly signaled to the committee that unlike others in Trump’s inner circle who are defying the panel’s subpoenas, Giuliani plans to take a less confrontational approach towards its requests.

Giuliani is reportedly still debating whether to give investigators an informal interview or a formal deposition. Giuliani, who spearheaded several unsuccessful Big Lie schemes to subvert the electiomn, has yet to determine if and how much information he might seek to block from the committee by using claims of executive privilege or attorney-client privilege with the former president, according to the Times.

Watch Kinzinger’s remarks below:

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