Sessions: Charlottesville Attack Meets Definition of Domestic Terrorism

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is sworn-in on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 13, 2017, prior to testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing about his role in the firing of James Comey, his Russian contacts during the campaign and his decision to recuse from an investigation into possible ties between Moscow and associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Attorney General Jeff Sessions prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 13, 2017, before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing about his role in the firing of James Comey, his Russian con... Attorney General Jeff Sessions prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 13, 2017, before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing about his role in the firing of James Comey, his Russian contacts during the campaign and his decision to recuse from an investigation into possible ties between Moscow and associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) MORE LESS

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the violent attack Saturday in Charlottesville, Virginia, in which a white supremacist allegedly drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters at a white supremacists rally, fits the Department of Justice’s definition of domestic terrorism.

“It does meet the definition of domestic terrorism in our statute. We’re pursuing it with the Department of Justice in every way we can make it, make a case,” he said, appearing on ABC’s “Good Morning America” Monday morning. “You can be sure we will charge and advance the investigation toward the most serious charges that can be brought, because this is an unequivocally unacceptable and evil attack that cannot be accepted in America, so absolutely that is a factor that we will be looking at.”

Sessions made the rounds on news shows Monday morning, defending the President for his initial statements about the incident, amid criticism that President Donald Trump didn’t go far enough to condemn white supremacists and neo-Nazi groups.

Trump’s initial comments condemned violence on “many sides,” but didn’t explicitly call out the white nationalist groups.

Dear Reader,

When we asked recently what makes TPM different from other outlets, readers cited factors like honesty, curiosity, transparency, and our vibrant community. They also pointed to our ability to report on important stories and trends long before they are picked up by mainstream outlets; our ability to contextualize information within the arc of history; and our focus on the real-world consequences of the news.

Our unique approach to reporting and presenting the news, however, wouldn’t be possible without our readers’ support. That’s not just marketing speak, it’s true: our work would literally not be possible without readers deciding to become members. Not only does member support account for more than 80% of TPM’s revenue, our members have helped us build an engaged and informed community. Many of our best stories were born from reader tips and valuable member feedback.

We do what other news outlets can’t or won’t do because our members’ support gives us real independence.

If you enjoy reading TPM and value what we do, become a member today.

Latest Livewire
Comments
Masthead Masthead
Founder & Editor-in-Chief:
Executive Editor:
Managing Editor:
Associate Editor:
Investigations Desk:
Reporters:
Newswriters:
Director of Audience:
Editor at Large:
General Counsel:
Publisher:
Head of Product:
Director of Technology:
Associate Publisher:
Front End Developer:
Senior Designer: