Kbogko9k8ycxc9ddjp6j

Zoe Schlanger

Zoë Schlanger is Frontpage Editor at TPM. Zoë was a TPM intern in 2011, and prior to returning here she was editor in chief of NYU Local, the alternative independent student news site at NYU. Zoë has interned at places like the Nation, InsideClimate News, The Rachel Maddow Show and Gothamist. She can be reached at zoe@talkingpointsmemo.com.

Articles by Zoe

 

North Carolina's Board of Elections is set to hear three cases Tuesday that challenge the state's new voting law on the premise that it attempts to supress student votes, the Raleigh News & Observer reported.

Gov. Pat McCrory (R) signed a complete overhaul of the state voting system into law in mid-August, which shortened early voting and required voter IDs, among other new rules. The measure set off a flurry of criticism from political figures like Colin Powell and Sen. Kay Hagan (D-NC), who argued that it infriged on voting rights of students, minorities, the elderly, and low-income citizens.

The measure also ended same-day registration, and eliminated a popular high school civics program that registered tens of thousands of students to vote each year prior to their 18th birthdays, if they would turn 18 by election time.

The cases scheduled to be heard by the state Board of Elections on Tuesday include a student who was barred from running for city council because the law prevented him from using his college dorm address to establish residency, as well as a challenge to the closure of several polling places on university campuses, which students claim prevented their ability to vote, according to the News & Observer.

 

North Carolina's Board of Elections is set to hear three cases Tuesday that challenge the state's new voting law on the premise that it attempts to supress student votes, the Raleigh News & Observer reported.

Gov. Pat McCrory (R) signed a complete overhaul of the state voting system into law in mid-August, which shortened early voting and required voter IDs, among other new rules. The measure set off a flurry of criticism from political figures like Colin Powell and Sen. Kay Hagan (D-NC), who argued that it infriged on voting rights of students, minorities, the elderly, and low-income citizens.

The measure also ended same-day registration, and eliminated a popular high school civics program that registered tens of thousands of students to vote each year prior to their 18th birthdays, if they would turn 18 by election time.

The cases scheduled to be heard by the state Board of Elections on Tuesday include a student who was barred from running for city council because the law prevented him from using his college dorm address to establish residency, as well as a challenge to the closure of several polling places on university campuses, which students claim prevented their ability to vote, according to the News & Observer.

 

As it seeks votes of approval from Congress on Syria, the Obama administration is "open to working" with legislators to change the language that would authorize the president to use military force, replacing the broad and open-ended resolution with a narrower, limited one, a senior White House official told the Hill Monday.

The draft language of the resolution currently grants Obama permission to use "necessary and appropriate" force. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy (D-VT) indicated earlier that he planned to rewrite and narrow that language, specifically to match Obama's promise of "no boots on the ground" in Syria. 

"The president made clear that he was not contemplating U.S. boots on the ground or an open-ended intervention, and that he intends to undertake tailored military operations, limited in scope and duration," the official said, according to the Hill. "We are open to working with Congress on language for the [authorization] within the parameters the president has explained."

By: TERRY COLLINS SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- The final stages are near completion for the launch of a law enforcement social media network designed exclusively for the men and women in blue.

Created by former high-profile New York City police commissioner and Los Angeles Police Chief Bill Bratton, BlueLine is being touted as a site where officers can share their expertise, insight and information securely through video, instant messaging, videoconferencing and screen share capabilities.

Read More →

President Barack Obama is set to meet with Russian LGBT rights groups as well as several other Russian human rights activists at this week's G20 summit in St. Petersburg, BuzzFeed reported Monday.

Obama cancelled a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin in August amid tension over the country's offer of asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden. The news of Obama's planned meeting with Russian LGBT activists is likely to be viewed as a jab at Putin, who signed an anti-gay law earlier this year.

From BuzzFeed: 

Four Russian non-governmental organizations told BuzzFeed Monday they had been invited to the meeting, scheduled for this Thursday at St. Petersburg’s Crowne Plaza Hotel. The groups include veteran human rights activists Lev Ponomarev and Lyudmila Alexeyeva, legal aid NGO director Pavel Chikov, and Coming Out, a St. Petersburg-based LGBT organization. Another local LGBT group, the LGBT Network, is believed to be attending, though director Igor Kochetkov declined to comment to BuzzFeed, saying that he had been “asked not to say anything.” 

Two-thirds of Britons do not care if refusing to intervene militarily in Syria damages the US-UK "special relationship," according to a BBC poll released Monday.

The poll also found 71 percent of Britons felt the House of Commons was right to reject Prime Minister David Cameron's call for military action in Syria last week.

The poll was commissioned by the BBC from ICM Research, which spoke to 1,000 adults in England, Scotland and Wales by telephone between Friday and Monday.

The official website for the U.S. Marines was hacked by a group purporting to be the Syrian Electronic Army on Monday, following President Obama's announcement that he would seek congressional approval for a military strike on Syria, the Independent reported.

The homepage of www.marines.com, the official Marines recruitment site, was changed to a page signed "delivered by the SEA," according to a screen shot posted by the Independent. The message on the page called for support from the Marines for their “brothers, the Syrian army soldiers."

The message read: 

This is a message written by your brothers in the Syrian Army, who have been fighting Al Qaeda for the last 3 years.
We understand your patriotism and love for your country so please understand our love for ours.
Obama is a traitor who wants to put your lives in danger to rescue Al Qaeda insurgents.
Marines, please take a look at what your comrades think about Obama's alliance with Al Qaeda against Syria.
Your officer in charge probably has no qualms about sending you to die against soldiers just like you, fighting a vile common enemy. The Syrian army should be your ally not your enemy.
Refuse your orders and concentrate on the real reason every soldier joins their military, to defend their homeland.
You're more than welcome to fight alongside our army rather than against it.
Your brothers, the Syrian army soldiers. A message delivered by the SEA

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg presided over the wedding of a gay couple Saturday evening at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

Kennedy Center President Michael Kaiser (left) is a longtime friend of Ginsburg's and asked her to preside over his wedding, the Associated Press reported. He was married to John Roberts, a government economist.

“I think it will be one more statement that people who love each other and want to live together should be able to enjoy the blessings and the strife in the marriage relationship,” Ginsburg told the Washington Post prior to the ceremony.

“It won’t be long before there will be another” performed by a justice, Ginsburg added. She has plans to preside over another wedding of a same-sex couple in September, according to the Post.

Senior officials in the Obama administration said that President Obama may still decide to strike Syria even if Congress disapproves of military action, CBS News White House correspondent Mark Knoller tweeted Saturday.

The House is set to vote on military action in Syria the week of September 9, House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) said in a statement Saturday.

Mary Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney and younger sister of Liz Cheney, a Wyoming Senate candidate, took to Facebook to criticize her sister’s recent statement reiterating her opposition to gay marriage, the New York Times reported Saturday.

Mary Cheney, who is openly gay and married her longtime partner last year, posted Friday evening: “For the record, I love my sister, but she is dead wrong on the issue of marriage.”

“Freedom means freedom for everyone,” she added, according to the NYT. “That means that all families — regardless of how they look or how they are made — all families are entitled to the same rights, privileges and protections as every other.” 

Their father, Dick Cheney, supports same-sex marriage. 

"I am strongly pro-life and I am not pro-gay marriage," Liz Cheney said a statement released earlier Friday. "I believe the issue of marriage must be decided by the states, and by the people in the states, not by judges and not even by legislators, but by the people themselves."

Photo: Mary Cheney, right, the openly gay daughter of then Vice President Dick Cheney, stands with Heather Poe, her longtime partner, at a Sept. 11th memorial service in 2006. Poe and Cheney married Friday, June 22, 2012, in Washington.

TPMLivewire