Yowco8c348ndhwfezgxi

Tom Kludt

Tom Kludt is a reporter for Talking Points Memo based in New York City, covering media and national affairs. Originally from South Dakota, Tom joined TPM as an intern in late-2011 and became a staff member during the 2012 election. He can be reached at tom@talkingpointsmemo.com.

Articles by Tom

A new poll shows that California voters have decidedly turned against the proposed $68 billion bullet train project that would connect Los Angeles and San Francisco.  

In the latest USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times survey, 55 percent of voters say they want the bond issue, which was approved through a statewide referendum in 2008, placed back on the ballot.  Perhaps most distressing to proponents of the bullet train such as Gov. Jerry Brown (D), who has been pressuring the state legislature to green light construction on the project: 59 percent say they would now vote against it.  

A pair of polls released Saturday show the Massachusetts Senate race is living up to its billing as one of the tightest contests in the 2012 election cycle.

The polls also indicate Elizabeth Warren is weathering the controversy surrounding her claims of Native American heritage that has vexed her campaign for weeks.

In the latest survey from Western New England University Polling Institute, Warren holds a slim lead over Sen. Scott Brown (R-MA), 45 percent to 43 percent. A poll from the Boston Globe also shows a 2 percentage point gap between the two, this time with Brown edging Warren, 39 percent to 37 percent.

The TPM Poll Average currently shows Brown and Warren virtually tied.

Read More →

The BBC reports that huge crowds have gathered in Tahir Square in Cairo to protest the life sentence given to former Egypt President Hosni Mubarak on Saturday.  Mubarak was handed the sentence by a judge for his role in the killing of protesters during last year's uprising that ultimately led to his downfall. 

From the Associated Press:

The U.S. Department of Justice says at least some materials sealed as part of the court case against seven men involved in the 1972 Watergate burglary should be released.

The agency responded Friday to a request by a Texas history professor who is seeking access to materials he believes could help answer lingering questions about the burglary that led to President Richard Nixon's resignation.



Democratic Senate hopeful Elizabeth Warren won the endorsement of her party on Saturday, officially securing the nomination to challenge Republican Sen. Scott Brown.  Warren garnered the support of 97.5 percent of delegates at the state Democratic convention in Springfield, Ma.  

A new Boston Globe poll released Saturday shows that a weeks-long dispute over her claims of Native American heritage has not derailed Elizabeth Warren's bid to unseat incumbent Sen. Scott Brown (R-MA) in the Massachusetts Senate race. 

The poll of 651 likely voters, which was conducted May 25-31, shows Brown with a thin lead over Warren, 39 percent to 37 percent.  That's well within the survey's margin of error of 3.8 percent and further confirmation that, despite the controversy that has dogged Warren's campaign as of late, the Massachusetts Senate race remains one of the most competitive in the country.  

The TPM Poll Average currently shows Brown with a narrow lead over Warren.

 

A new CNN/ORC International poll released Friday shows President Barack Obama with a narrow three-point edge over Republican nominee Mitt Romney among registered voters nationwide.

According to the poll, Obama garners the support of 49-percent of voters while Romney trails with 46-percent support.  The poll, which was conducted May 29-31, included a sample of 895 registered voters.  It has a margin of error of 3.5 percent.

The TPM Poll Average currently shows Obama nursing a very small lead over Romney.

 

A new survey from Democratic-leaning Public Policy Polling (PPP) shows attitudes toward same-sex marriage have shifted among African-American voters in Missouri.  In the poll, conducted May 24-27, black voters now support the right of gay and lesbian couples to get married, 50-31 percent.  

While African-Americans only comprised 11-percent of the poll's total sample of 602 voters, that still marks a decided shift since PPP's survey in January, when black voters in Missouri opposed same-sex marriage, 25-44 percent.  

TPMLivewire