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Tierney Sneed

Tierney Sneed is a reporter for Talking Points Memo. She previously worked for U.S. News and World Report. She grew up in Florida and attended Georgetown University.

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GOP frontrunner Donald Trump slammed Republicans in Congress for not being willing to threaten a government shutdown in recent budget negotiations, Business Insider reported. The real estate mogul said historians would ultimately blame "Barack Hussein Obama" if the government had shutdown in a budget standoff.

"They're horrible poker players. Horrible," Trump said at a rally in Florida Saturday, according to Business Insider. "I like Boehner as a person. He's a nice guy. But ... I heard Boehner before he left say there's no way we're going to close up government."

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Some of the black pastors scheduled to meet with the Donald Trump Monday are pushing back at his campaign's claims that they will endorse him after the meeting. According to the Daily Beast, a number of pastors have taken to social media to deny that the meeting means Trump will gain their support.

“I am not officially endorsing ANY candidate and when I do you will NOT need to hear it from pulpitting courtjesters who suffer from intellectual and spiritual myopia," Bishop Clarence McClendon, a Los Angeles-based minister who had been invited to the meeting, said on Facebook, the Daily Beast reported. O

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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) were the first presidential candidates to weigh in on Friday's shooting at a Colorado Planned Parenthood that left three including a police officer dead. Both included the hashtag #StandWithPP in their tweets Friday evening reacting to the attack.

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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) were the first presidential candidates to weigh in on Friday's shooting at a Colorado Planned Parenthood that left three including a police officer dead. Both included the hashtag #StandWithPP in their tweets Friday evening reacting to the attack.

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President Obama weighed in on Friday's Planned Parenthood shooting in a statement released Saturday morning. He condemned the gunman "for terrorizing an entire community" and praised the University of Colorado Colorado Springs Police Officer Garrett Swasey, who was among the three people killed in the attack.

"This is not normal. We can’t let it become normal," the statement said. "If we truly care about this -- if we’re going to offer up our thoughts and prayers again, for God knows how many times, with a truly clean conscience -- then we have to do something about the easy accessibility of weapons of war on our streets to people who have no business wielding them. Period. Enough is enough."

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In a speech laying out her plan to fight terrorism, former Secretary of State and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton bashed the recent calls to block Syrian refugees after Friday's Paris attack

Clinton kicked off the Thursday speech, given at New York's Council on Foreign Relations, by implicitly criticizing the anti-refugee hysteria that has overcome American politics since 129 people were killed by Islamic extremists.

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The House will vote Thursday afternoon on the first of what could be many legislative moves geared to curb President Obama's Syrian refugee resettlement program. The legislation, called the America SAFE Act, would require that the heads of federal security agencies personally approve of the background investigations of each refugee admitted and certify that the refugee poses no security threat.

The White House has already vowed to veto the House GOP bill and Democrats are putting together their own alternative. Nevertheless, some Dems are expected to vote with Republicans Thursday, while on the right, conservatives are already clamoring that the bill does not go far enough in targeting Obama's plan to allow 10,000 Syrian refugees to resettle in the United States this fiscal year.

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Simmering anti-refugee sentiment in the U.S. has blown up into full-fledged xenophobic hysteria since Friday’s terrorist attacks in Paris.

The assaults -- conducted largely, it is believed, by French and Belgian nationals -- turned into fodder for Republicans to amp up their attacks on the Obama administration's previously announced plans to accept more Syrian refugees next year.

Even before details of the attackers’ backgrounds had emerged, GOP candidates were screaming that refugees from regions torn by the Islamic State be banned from the United States. Cable news pundits fueled the fire, speculating even before assault was over that the flow of migrants through Europe were connected to attack. By Monday, the backlash to the U.S. long tradition of accepting refugees was in full force and Congress was flirting with the idea of shutting down the government over Obama’s refugee plans.

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