P2vnjvupjgazdwptr1ik

Tierney Sneed

Tierney Sneed is a reporter for Talking Points Memo. She previously worked for U.S. News and World Report. She grew up in Florida and attended Georgetown University.

Articles by

If Mitt Romney holds any grudge against Sheldon Adelson for funding the GOP rivals who roiled his 2012 GOP presidential primary campaign, he isn’t showing it.

The failed GOP nominee and the Las Vegas casino magnate are teaming up to see that the 2016 presidential race is not a repeat of the 2012 campaign for Republicans. Politico reports that Romney and Adelson have joined forces to convince donors to rally behind the conservative White House contenders with broad appeal and stymie the sort of long-shot candidacies that wrought havoc in 2012.

Read More →

State lawmakers are struggling to come up with a contingency plan if the Supreme Court invalidates their federal Obamacare subsidies, according to a Washington Post op-ed by policy experts.

“Dozens of interviews conducted by our research team with political leaders, agency officials and advocacy organizations in those states indicate that the states are almost completely underprepared for the Supreme Court’s decision in [King v. Burwell],” wrote David K. Jones, an assistant professor at the Boston University School of Public Health, and Nicholas Bagley, an assistant professor of law at the University of Michigan.

Read More →

Add Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) to the list of conservatives resisting any plan that would temporarily extend Obamacare subsidies if the Supreme Court strikes them down later this month.

The 2016 GOP White House contender told Politico he would fight a Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY)-endorsed proposal to extend the subsidies through 2017, when Republicans hope a Republican president would be in office to push a comprehensive alternative to Obamacare.

Read More →

Legislation blocked by the North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory (R) allowing public authorities to opt-out of officiating same-sex marriages will become law, after the North Carolina House secured the necessary votes Thursday to override McCrory’s veto. Previously, the Senate had voted to do the same.

The legislation, known as Senate Bill 2, will allow magistrates and registers of deeds to decline to participate in any marriage -- not just same-sex ones -- if they object to the marriage on religious grounds. Critics say it will open the door to all sorts of discrimination, not just discrimination of gays and lesbians, given its vague language.

Read More →

The number of multiracial babies jumped by ten-fold over the last four decades, according to data in a new report from the Pew Research Center. The findings were derived from Census Bureau data and were contained in the new report released Thursday titled Multiracial in America. In 1970, only 1 percent of children under the age of 1 were multiracial. By 2013, 10 percent were.

Read More →

Prosecutors have dropped murder charges against a Georgia woman who took abortion pills in an apparent attempt to terminate her pregnancy, the Washington Post is reporting. Dougherty County District Attorney Greg Edwards said the termination was still illegal, but that Georgia law does not apply to the woman herself, 23-year-old Kenlissia Jones of Albany, Georgia.

“Although third parties could be criminally prosecuted for their actions relating to an illegal abortion, as the law currently stands in Georgia, criminal prosecution of a pregnant woman for her own actions against her unborn child does not seem permitted,” Edwards told the Washington Post. “Applicable criminal law and statutes provide explicit immunity from prosecution for a pregnant woman for any unlawful termination of her pregnancy.”

Read More →

The 20-week abortion ban is poised to get its biggest moment yet when Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) rolls out his own federal version Thursday.

While Graham's bill stands little chance of overcoming an expected Democratic filibuster in the Senate, it shines a light on a measure already on track to be a major 2016 issue and which abortion rights proponents fear looks reasonable enough to voters but is in fact a trojan horse with major legal implications.

While the bans only apply to a relatively small portion of abortions, they are part of a much broader, long-term legal strategy among anti-abortion activists to push the Supreme Court into chipping away at some of the protections established in Roe v. Wade.

Read More →

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit has cleared the way for most of a restrictive Texas abortion law -- that among other things requires clinics to meet hospital-like standards and providers to attain special credentials with local hospitals -- to go into effect.

"In plain terms, H.B. 2 and its provisions may be applied throughout

Texas," the appeals court panel said, with the exception of one clinic in McAllen, Texas, where certain provisions had previously been blocked by the Supreme Court. According to the Center for Reproductive Rights, all but seven of the clinics in the state stand risk of closing.

The suit, brought by Center for Reproductive Rights on behalf of independent providers in the state, was the second federal challenge to Texas' omnibus abortion law, which passed in a special session in 2013 after then-Sen. Wendy Davis filibustered lawmakers' initial attempts to advance it. The law mandates that clinics meet the standards required of ambulatory surgical centers, requires that providers attain special credentials known as "admitting privileges" at local hospitals, bans abortions after 20 weeks and puts restrictions on the use of medication abortion (also known as the abortion pill).

Read More →

Republican state lawmakers in Louisiana and anti-tax crusader Grover Norquist are in a war of words over the state's terrible budget options, with Gov. Bobby Jindal (R), a 2016 White House contender, stuck in the middle.

The state faces an enormous $1.6 billion budget shortfall, a reality Jindal blames on falling oil revenues. However, he is one of a number of GOP governors, many of them considering presidential runs, who have found themselves with budget crises due to their unwillingness to raise tax revenue. Jindal's anti-tax orthodoxy has limited legislators' options for balancing the state's budget and means the state is facing the prospect of drastic cuts in key areas like higher education.

For months now legislators have accused Jindal of kowtowing to Norquist's "no tax pledge," which stipulates that taxes cannot be raised unless they’re offset by spending cuts elsewhere. And this weekend they'd had enough. A group of self-described "conservative" Republican state representatives took their complaints to Norquist himself, asking him to give them some wiggle room on raising taxes and to shoot down some Jindal-backed legislation that they say would set a "dangerous precedent" in how government could mask revenue hikes.

Read More →

LiveWire