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Tierney Sneed

Tierney Sneed is a reporter for Talking Points Memo. She previously worked for U.S. News and World Report. She grew up in Florida and attended Georgetown University.

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Chief Justice John Roberts may have upheld a crucial part of Obamacare in King v. Burwell, but not without a few choice words for Congress, accusing it of "inartful drafting" in crafting the law.

"The Affordable Care Act contains more than a few examples of inartful drafting," Roberts wrote in his majority opinion for King v. Burwell. "Several features of the Act’s passage contributed to that unfortunate reality. Congress wrote key parts of the Act behind closed doors, rather than through 'the traditional legislative process.'"

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In his dissent from the Supreme Court's decision upholding Obamacare subsidies in 34 states, Justice Antonin Scalia accused the six-vote majority of engaging in "interpretive jiggery-pokery."

The court "rewrites the law to make tax credits available everywhere," he wrote. "We should start calling this law SCOTUScare."

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In addition to the nine state murder charges suspected Charleston shooter Dylann Roof is facing, federal investigators are also considering bringing hate-crime charges against the 21-year-old, according to a New York Times report.

Sources told the New York Times that there is a consensus among officials in the Department of Justice and FBI that federal charges are necessary in the case, given the apparent racial motivations behind the massacre.

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Days after FBI director James Comey said he did not think the Charleston attack that left nine dead qualified as terrorism, FBI officials now say they have not ruled out investigating the shooting as a terrorist act. FBI Spokesman Paul Bresson told MSNBC that depending on the evidence uncovered by federal investigators, the agency would be open to pursuing domestic terrorism charges, as opposed to just the hate crime charges as originally suggested.

“Both hate crime and domestic terrorism investigations afford investigators the same set of tools and techniques,” Bresson said Wednesday. “Any eventual federal charges will be determined by the facts at the conclusion of the investigation, and are not influenced by how the investigation is initially opened.”

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The racially-motivated massacre that left nine African Americans dead in a historic South Carolina black church has prompted the removal of a symbol of the Confederacy in another place of worship. The governing board of the Citadel -- a military college located in Charleston, South Carolina -- has voted to relocate the Confederate Naval Jack from its place in the institution's Summerall Chapel.

By a 9-3 vote, the Citadel's Board of Visitors put in motion the removal of the flag Tuesday. Doing so will requiring the authorization of the South Carolina legislature, as the flag's placement was part of the state's Heritage Act, the 2000 legislation that also put the Confederate battle flag on the state Capitol grounds.

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The Sons of Confederate Veterans will not just stand by passively and watch one of their cherished symbols removed from the South Carolina statehouse grounds. "Our heritage is under serious attack," read a post on the group's Facebook page. The national group held a conference call last night to organize its lobbying efforts in light of what it called "the rapidly changing situation in Columbia, South Carolina," according to another post on its Facebook page.

“I am concerned because this is a mass hysteria on anything Confederate, whether it is South Carolina or Georgia, or I got calls from what’s happening in Washington state and Alabama. It’s all over and it just seems like a feeding frenzy,” Charles Kelly Barrow, the commander in chief of the national Sons of Confederate Veterans organization, told TPM. “It’s wrong and it’s tragic that they’re taking something that happened in South Carolina -- a tragedy -- and people are trying to make political statements.”

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With major cases ahead, the Supreme Court has added decision announcements to its calendar for this Thursday and Friday, in addition to the opinions already scheduled for next Monday, June 29. It is still unclear, however, which of the expected opinions will be handed down on each day. The Supreme Court could also add more days to the calendar if it so chose, though it typically completes its term by the end of June.

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Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a GOP 2016 candidate, suggested he would support temporarily extending at least some aspects of Obamacare if the Supreme Court strikes down a key provision in a pending case.

"I think you have to have a transition period. I can’t think of any other way to do this that’s thoughtful," Perry told RealClearPolitics. "We moved a long way when this thing became law. You don’t turn around a huge ship just overnight. It takes a transition period. I think most Americans, whether they’re strict conservatives economically, would find that to be out of the realm of appropriate."

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As many critics call on South Carolina to take down the Confederate flag flying near its statehouse, the White House reiterated President Obama's stance on the symbol.

Obama believes "the Confederate flag belongs in a museum," White House spokesman Eric Schultz told reporters aboard Air Force One Friday.

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