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Sahil Kapur

Sahil Kapur is TPM's senior congressional reporter and Supreme Court correspondent. His articles have been published in the Huffington Post, The Guardian and The New Republic. Email him at sahil@talkingpointsmemo.com and follow him on Twitter at @sahilkapur.

Articles by Sahil

Five months ago, conservative were so livid over President Barack Obama's upcoming "executive amnesty" that incoming House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA) couldn't bring himself to rule out impeaching the president as punishment.

Now, even firebrand Rep. Steve King (R-IA) and Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL), Obama's chief immigration foes, have ruled that out. GOP leaders were never seriously considering the idea, but they've successfully tamped down any talk of it.

What's more, Republicans may be on the brink of avoiding a government shutdown fight, at least until March, and effectively permitting the executive actions by "Emperor Obama," as Speaker John Boehner's (R-OH) office has dubbed him, with no pushback other than a symbolic vote of disapproval.

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Impeachment has faded in Republican circles as an option to punish President Barack Obama over his sweeping executive actions to reshape immigration enforcement, ruled out even by hardliners like Rep. Steve King (R-IA) who are livid with the president and want to retaliate.

An alternative that has gained some traction among Republicans is to "censure" the president. The idea has been endorsed by King and Rep. Raul Labrador, both influential GOP voices on immigration issues. National Review writer John Fund has been pushing it for months.

"I think we should censure the president of the United States," Labrador said on CBS, days after Obama announced his actions. "I think it’s unfortunate that he did this, I think we need to lay out clearly why this is unlawful."

Republican House leaders have been mum on how they'll respond to Obama, and are waiting to gauge the level of enthusiasm for a censure vote on Tuesday during their first full conference meeting since the president announced his actions.

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Chief Justice John Roberts may be feeling a flash of déjà vu.

For the second time in three years, the Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case aimed at toppling Obamacare. Roberts again finds himself caught between the wishes of a movement that made him America's most powerful judge, and the reputation of his institution which is being asked to cripple a sitting president's signature law for the first time in nearly 80 years.

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg underwent a medical procedure to have a stent placed in her right coronary artery on Wednesday morning, the Supreme Court said.

Ginsburg, 81, is "resting comfortably" and expected to be discharged within the next two days, the Court said.

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