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Sahil Kapur

Sahil Kapur is TPM's senior congressional reporter and Supreme Court correspondent. His articles have been published in the Huffington Post, The Guardian and The New Republic. Email him at sahil@talkingpointsmemo.com and follow him on Twitter at @sahilkapur.

Articles by Sahil

Democrat Joe Donnelly was declared the winner in the Indiana Senate race, defeating Republican Richard Mourdock.

Fox News and NBC News projected the result Tuesday night.

As expected, Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) will win reelection, CNN projected Tuesday evening.

He was the strong favorite to defeat Republican nominee John Raese.

Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders has won reelection in Vermont, CNN projected Tuesday evening.

He was widely expected to win in the solidly liberal state.

During a halftime interview on Monday Night Football, Mitt Romney was asked what he'd change in sports if he had one choice.

"It has to be the specter of drugs -- and performance enhancing drugs of all kinds," he said. "We have to continue to battle that. We have to make sure that our technology keeps up with the people that are trying to skirt around the law. ... We're going to have to change the culture that says to people, using performance enhancing drugs is acceptable. It is simply not."

 

In a halftime interview during Monday Night Football, President Obama likened political reporters to sports journalists.

"Political reporters are a lot like sports reporters," he said. "You lose a game and you're a bum. You win a game, you're a God. You know, the truth is, just like in sports, in politics we're all human, we make mistakes. Sometimes we perform well. But the key is to just stay focused on what it is that you're doing."

At one of his final campaign rallies in Ohio on Monday night, Mitt Romney implored the crowd, "Let's make sure everyone we know gets out to vote on Tuesday."

In the last day before the Election Day, Mitt Romney warned a crowd in Sanford, Florida that reelecting President Obama may cause another recession:

Throughout the campaign, using every argument he can think of, President Obama has tried to convince you that the last four years have been a success. And so his plan for the next four years is take all the ideas from his first four years. You know, the stimulus, the tax increase, the borrowing, obama care, and do them all over again. He calls this plan forward. I call it forewarned. That same path means $20 trillion in debt. It means continuing crippling unemployment. It means depressed home values. Stagnant take home pay. And a devastated military. Unless we change course, we may be looking at another recession as well. In his closing argument, did you hear this just the other day? President Obama asked his supporters to vote for revenge. For revenge. Instead I ask the American people to vote for love of country.

(Emphasis added.)

A broad swath of mainstream economists believe the U.S. economy is rebounding and set to improve regardless of which candidate wins on Tuesday.

Romney added that if Obama is reelected, "there'll be threats of shutdown and default again" -- presumably from House Republicans who have a bitter relationship with the president.

In the event that President Obama wins reelection on Tuesday, Republicans have already found their scapegoat: Hurricane Sandy.

Just days before Election Day, GOP pundits and prognosticators -- and some within the Romney campaign -- are roundly describing the devastating storm as the critical event that halted their candidate's upswing in the polls, which give Obama a clear advantage in the electoral college math.

"The hurricane is what broke Romney's momentum. I don't think there's any question about it," said Haley Barbour, a former Mississippi governor, RNC chairman and respected political strategist, on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday. "What happened was the news media absolutely blacked out any coverage of the issues."

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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) spoke to Reuters:

(Reuters) - Normally outspoken Nancy Pelosi is mum about her future.

She won't say if she will step aside as Democratic leader of the U.S. House of Representatives if her party fails, as expected, to win back the chamber from Republicans in Tuesday's elections.

Pelosi, 72, told the news organization, "Right now, our focus is on one thing -- winning."

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