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Sahil Kapur

Sahil Kapur is TPM's senior congressional reporter and Supreme Court correspondent. His articles have been published in the Huffington Post, The Guardian and The New Republic. Email him at sahil@talkingpointsmemo.com and follow him on Twitter at @sahilkapur.

Articles by Sahil

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) offered his take on the fiscal cliff in a floor speech Tuesday, calling on the House to take up the Senate-passed bill to avert tax hikes on middle incomes.

An excerpt from Reid's speech:

"In fact, we could avert the fiscal cliff for 98 percent of American families and 97 percent of small businesses today. The House must only consider the Senate-passed bill freezing tax rates for those making less than $250,000 a year.

"This Congress is but one vote away from avoiding the fiscal cliff for middle class families and small businesses.

In a floor speech Tuesday, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) said President Obama should not overinterpret his re-election victory, arguing that control of the White House, Senate and House remains what it was in the wake of the 2010 Republican wave.

An excerpt from McConnell's speech:

“In politics, there is always a temptation among those who win office to think they have a mandate to do what they will. But it’s important to remember that in this case the voters also re-elected a Republican-controlled House last week, and a closely divided Senate. And in a government of three equal branches, that’s hardly irrelevant.

“Most people may focus on the White House, but the fact is, the government is organized no differently today than it was after the Republican wave of 2010.

Senate Democrats will enter the new year with an expanded majority of 55-45, having gained two seats in the election. They may be emboldened, but Republicans will retain the ability to slow down or halt their agenda with the use of the filibuster, which requires 41 senators.

If Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell continues to wield the filibuster as routinely as he did in President Obama's first term, Majority Leader Harry Reid will need to pick off at least five Republican senators to advance initiatives.

Here are his five most likely targets.

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In the wake of President Obama's reelection, due in part to his winning Hispanic voters by 44 points, Sens. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and Lindsey Graham (R-SC) have restarted bipartisan discussions over comprehensive immigration reform.

On the Sunday talk shows, both sounded bullish about reaching an agreement.

"Senator Graham and I have talked, and we are resuming the talks that were broken off two years ago," Schumer said on NBC's "Meet The Press." "We had put together a comprehensive detailed blueprint on immigration reform. It had the real potential for bipartisan support."

"Graham and I are talking to our colleagues about this right now," he said, "and I think we have a darn good chance using this blueprint to get something done this year."

Read More →

Appearing Sunday on NBC's "Meet The Press," Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) sounded an optimstic note about the prospects for a comprehensive immigration reform deal this year.

"Senator [Lindsey] Graham and I have talked, and we are resuming the talks that were broken off two years ago," he said. "We had put together a comprehensive detailed blueprint on immigration reform. It had the real potential for bipartisan support."

Schumer described the contours of the plan: close the borders, crack down on employers who hire illegal immigrants, clear the way for immigrants the country needs and a path to citizenship for undocumented people.

"Graham and I are talking to our colleagues about this right now, and I think we have a darn good chance using this blueprint to get something done this year," he said. "The Republican Party has learned that being anti-immigrant doesn't work for them politically."

On ABC's "This Week," Sen. Saxby Chambliss weighed in on the debate over taxes and the fiscal cliff.

"Listen, Speaker Boehner said it, I think, very well -- I thought he showed great leadership by saying revenues need to be on the table," he said.

He talked up Bowles-Simpson as a model for dealing with the fiscal cliff, arguing that the deal must also reform entitlement programs.

Appearing Sunday on ABC's "This Week" Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), a member of the Democratic leadership, telegraphed her party's intentions if Republicans refuse to accept a tax increase on the wealthy.

"[T]o solve this problem, the wealthiest Americans have to pay their fair share too," she said. "If the Republicans will not agree with that, we will reach a point at the end of this year where all the tax cuts expire and we'll start over next year, and whatever we do will be a tax cut for whatever package we put together. That may be the way to get past this."

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), the highest ranked House Republican woman, said Sunday on CNN's "State of the Union" that Republicans need to become more "modern" but not "moderate."

"I don't think it's about the Republican Party needing to become more moderate; I really believe it's the Republican Party becoming more modern," she said. "And whether it's Hispanics, whether it's women, whether it's young people, the Republican Party has to make it a priority to take our values, to take our vision to every corner of this country."

"I think it's more about the messenger and who's communicating our values to every corner of this country."

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), the highest ranked woman in the House Republican conference, said Sunday on CNN's "State of the Union" that Americans largely voted for the status quo.

"What I saw largely was a status quo election. The voters decided to keep things basically the same with the Republicans in the majority in the House, and the Democrats with the presidency and the Senate," she said. "But they also recognize that both parties have something very important to offer."

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