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Josh Marshall

Josh Marshall is editor and publisher of TalkingPointsMemo.com.

Articles by Josh

Louie Gohmert: "Once I observed the map depicting ‘hostile,’ ‘permissive,’ and ‘uncertain’ states and locations, I was rather appalled that the hostile areas amazingly have a Republican majority, ‘cling to their guns and religion,’ and believe in the sanctity of the United States Constitution."

Was ISIS behind the failed attack on Pam Geller's Muhammad cartoon event in Garland, Texas? Today ISIS has taken responsibility for the attack and claimed more will be coming. Predictably, right-wingers have swelled at this claim of responsibility to elevate the significance of the attack and claim that ISIS has mounted its first attack on the US mainland.

Let's wait to see if there turns out to be any evidence at all for this claim.

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One of the best parts of the conspiracy theory embraced by top Republicans in Texas is the idea that shuttered Walmart stores are actually being prepared as either staging areas or detention facilities for President Obama's planned military takeover of Texas. Some theorize that the military and Walmart may be preparing tunnels connecting the shuttered Walmarts as part of the takeover. But Walmart now says there's "no truth to the rumors" that they're involved.

We're trying to keep you updated on people who think we need to be worried that President Obama may be plotting to take over Texas with US military special operations forces operating under the guise of a military training exercise. So far we've got the Governor of Texas, Greg Abbott, Sen. Ted Cruz, Chuck Norris, Rand Paul and Ron Paul.

So far the only people to push back in the opposite direction seem to be people who've already been tossed from politics for being RINOs.

As long time readers know, each year we do a big annual survey of our readers. It takes about ten minutes to fill out. It's really basic questions. And it is a huge help to our whole organization, because it goes right to our bottom line, how we pay staff and all the expenses that keep this small independent publication going. We're going to be running the survey later this week. So when you see my post announcing it, please take a few moments to fill it out. We really appreciate it.

After the jump, more information about why it's important and how we protect your privacy.

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Last week in the first installment of our series Nona Willis Aronowitz looked at America's faltering love affair with the car. Fewer men see cars as a key way to define their identity, technology has become a new focus of conspicuous consumption, energy prices are (at least usually) high and in many big cities cars simply aren't necessary. Today, in part two of our series, we look at the other side of the equation. Outside of a few big cities - and in many cases even within them - a car (something that is often out of reach for the working poor) remains a key element of economic survival or the possibility of decent life. Read part two here.

When George Lincoln Rockwell, the American Nazi Party leader, was shot and killed in 1967 it was wrong. Same with George Wallace (who was gravely wounded and paralyzed, not killed) in 1972 or with Meir Kahane in 1990 - precisely because as a society we value free speech and we also don't allow civilians to kill people they don't like. But just as with these other worthies, we should prosecute the offenders (perhaps difficult in this case since at least the two on the scene are dead) without valorizing people who run hate groups. It's really that simple. There is zero contradiction between the two judgments. Pam Geller is a cancerous presence in the US political conversation; same with her pal Geert Wilders, the flamboyant and parodic far-right, racist Dutch parliamentarian she brought for her Muhammed cartoon event down in Texas. Political violence is the greatest corrosive of free and ordered societies. But a hate group is a hate group the day after someone takes a shot at them just like it was the day before.

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