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Igor Bobic

Igor Bobic is the assistant editor of Talking Points Memo, helping oversee the site's coverage of politics and policy in Washington. While originally from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Igor feels best at home on the beaches of Southern California. He can be reached at igor@talkingpointsmemo.com.

Articles by Igor

A 5.9-magnitude earthquake that hit northern Italy in the early hours of Sunday morning has risen to a 7 magnitude. A collapsed oratory is seen at San Carlo in the Emilia-Romagna region, northern Italy, below:

 

Per CBS:

About 300 people were arrested and 20 were injured as protesters clashed with police Sunday night and into the morning in defiance of new legislation cracking down on student-stoked demonstrations sparked by the province's proposed tuition hikes.

People - and dogs - around the world used many methods to catch a glimpse of the annual eclipse which took place Sunday night.

(Photo credit: */Kyodo/Newscom)

The White House just released this photo of what looks like President Obama throwing a Hail Mary pass on the field at Soldier Field following the NATO working dinner in Chicago, Illinois on Saturday.

(Credit: Pete Souza | White House)

House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) on ABC's "This Week" called Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin's decision to renounce his United States citizenship in order to avoid paying taxes on his Facebook stock "absolutely outrageous."

Boehner said that while such a move was "already against the law," and that a new bill sponsored by Sens. Chuck Schumer and Bob Casey that would ensure Saverin paid the taxes and bar him from re-entering the U.S. was unnecessary, he would support it anyway.

"If it's necessary, I'd surely support it," Boehner said.

Appearing on "Fox News Sunday" this morning, Karl Rove called a newly revealed proposal to torpedo President Obama in November using Rev. Jeremiah Wright "stupid."

“Speaking from the perspective of the Super PAC, you want to try to do things that you think will be helpful to the Super PAC and not things that will be hurtful, and Frankly trying to dredge up Jeremiah Wright right or wrong after this issue was litigated four years ago by John McCain deciding not to litigate it was stupid,” he said.

Appearing on CNN's "State Of The Union," Obama adviser David Axelrod said that attacks on Gov. Mitt Romney's faith, Mormonism are "not fair game."

"Does the re-elect committee repudiate the idea that Mormonism should be on the table?" CNN's Candy Crowley asked.

"Absolutely and we have right along," Axelorod said. "We've said that's not fair game. And we wish that Governor Romney would stand up as strongly and as resolutely consistently to -- to -- to refute these kinds of things on his side. Instead he's amplified them in the past. And he's put logs on that fire. And that's not leadership."

Appearing on NBC's "Meet The Press" on Sunday, Newark, New Jersey Mayor and Obama surrogate Cory Booker said he was "uncomfortable" with the Obama campaign's attacks on Mitt Romney's record with Bain Capital.

"It's a distraction from the real issues," Booker said, of both attacks on Bain and Rev. Jeremiah Wright. "It's either gonna be a small campaign about this crap, or it's gonna be a big campaign about the issues the American public cares about."

"I'm not about to sit here and indict private equity," Booker added. "If you look at the totality of Bain Capital's record, they've done a lot to support businesses — to grow businesses. And this to me, I'm very uncomfortable."

Booker's remarks stepped on the Obama campaign's portrayal of Mitt Romney's time at Bain - and instantly gave fodder to Republicans with a "They Said It!" RNC posting.

Watch the video below, at about the 7:00 mark:

 

 

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

On NBC's "Meet The Press," Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) declined to say whether he was being vetted for Mitt Romney's running mate.

“Look, I’m not going to get into the internal process of another campaign," he said. "I’m focused on doing my job here as a Wisconsin congressman, as a budget committee chairman. So I’m just not going to get into that speculation.”

Appearing on NBC's "Meet The Press" on Sunday morning, host David Gregory asked Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) and Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) how both of their parties will respond should Barack Obama or Mitt Romney win the election in November.

"What's going to happen at the end of the year is largely going to be determined by who wins in this November election," Ryan said of the impending budget issues - Bush tax cuts, debt limit and unemployment insurance - that need to be addressed by the end of this year.

Gregory then asked Ryan that if the outcome of these major issues depends on the election, what his party's response will be should President Obama win.

"Are you saying the election will not change what Republican leaders will do and should do in order to compromise?" Gregory pressed.

"We would like to do tax reform," Ryan said, largely ducking the question.

Gregory then posed the same question to Sen. Durbin.

"If Gov. Romney wins, do Democratic leaders say 'you know what, we're going to have to compromise on this?'"

"Gov. Romney wants to return to same policies as Bush administration," Durbin hedged, maintaining that Senate Democrats would pursue a bipartisan approach by sticking with Bowles-Simpson principles, the deficit commission set up by President Obama that failed to produce a real solution in 2009.

"It doesn't sound like the election is going to solve anything that's going to lead to Washington governing any better," David Gregory incredulously remarked at a panel following the segment.

Panelist Mike Murphy, a Republican strategist, retorted that "the tough reality is that elections are about not solving anything, because when you solve something you go to the voters with pain."

"So the elections are about winning and then maybe doing something later," Murphy added.

Watch the video below:

 

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

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