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Hunter Walker

Hunter Walker is a national affairs reporter for TPM. He came to the site in 2013 from the New York Observer. He has also written for New York Magazine, Gawker, the Village Voice, Forbes, The Daily, and Deadspin. He can be reached at hunter@talkingpointsmemo.com

Articles by Hunter

Though the latest poll showed a majority of New Yorkers want Anthony Weiner to drop out of the mayor's race, he shows no signs of quitting despite a week of nonstop coverage, questions, criticism, and at least one defecting staffer. All three of Weiner's main rivals -- City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, former Comptroller Bill Thompson, and Public Advocate Bill de Blasio -- have called for him to give up the ghost, but with the race entering its home stretch -- a little more than 40 days until the crucial Sept. 10 Democratic primary -- the reality is, some of Weiner's opponents might benefit from having Weiner to kick around a while longer.

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A new Quinnipiac poll of the Democratic primary in the New York City mayoral election released Monday afternoon shows Anthony Weiner moving from frontrunner to last place among the major candidates after dropping 10 points in the wake of his sexting scandal.

Weiner was in first place with 26 percent in the last Quinnipiac poll, which was conducted just before the scandal spent days in the headlines. The new poll Monday showed Weiner in fourth place with 16 percent compared to 27 percent for City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, 21 percent for Public Advocate Bill de Blasio, and 20 percent for former Comptroller Bill Thompson. 

This is the second poll indicating Weiner's scandal has cost him support following an NBC 4 New York/Wall Street Journal/Marist College poll released last Thursday that showed a nine point drop for Weiner

Aside from providing further evidence of Weiner's decline, the poll was a strong showing for Bill de Blasio, who many insiders were counting out prior to the scandal. De Blasio was up six points from his number in the last Quinnipiac poll meaning he gained slightly more than Quinn who was up five percent. Thompson's numbers were unchanged between the two polls. 

 

 

 

In an email to supporters Monday afternoon, New York City mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner criticized the media and his rivals for focusing on his latest sexting scandal. He also asked voters to focus on his political "vision" for the city rather than "old stories" about his private life. 

"TV pundits, newspaper publishers and, of course, my opponents - they've all made up their minds that they want to stop our campaign right now. Well, at least they are consistent. These same folks have been howling about me running from the moment I first got in. But this race isn't about them. It's about you. You should decide," Weiner wrote. "I knew that revelations about my past private life might come back to embarrass me. I never hid from that possibility. But, I waged this campaign on a bet that the citizens of my city would be more interested in a vision for improving their lives rather than in old stories about mine."

Weiner closed the email by asking supporters to donate to help him "fight back."

Read the full email below:

"From: Anthony Weiner

Subject: [Redacted] - I'll let you decide.

Dear [Redacted]:


So here is what I learned this weekend - a lot of people who don’t have a vote, want to decide who our next Mayor will be.


TV pundits, newspaper publishers and, of course, my opponents - they've all made up their minds that they want to stop our campaign right now. 


Well, at least they are consistent. These same folks have been howling about me running from the moment I first got in. 


But this race isn't about them. It's about you. You should decide.


I knew that revelations about my past private life might come back to embarrass me. I never hid from that possibility. But, I waged this campaign on a bet that the citizens of my city would be more interested in a vision for improving their lives rather than in old stories about mine.


I am going to continue to lead the debate about ideas for the middle class and those struggling to make it. Soon, I will publish yet another book of ideas for New York. I will be giving more policy speeches and revamping our website to include even more ways that New Yorkers can become involved with our campaign. I'll be showing up at community forums, televised debates, street fairs, worship services and just about everywhere that New Yorkers gather. In short, I'm going to keep doing what I've always done. I'm going to keep on fighting for my city.


And then you get to decide who will be our next Mayor, not them.


I hope to see you soon,


Anthony


PS - My opponents have some pretty big megaphones on their side.  If you'd like to help me fight back, please donate $10, $20 or anything you can afford by clicking below."

Quinnipiac University Polling Institute is scheduled to release its first post-Weiner scandal poll of the Democratic primary in the New York City mayoral election at 4 p.m. ET Monday. 

This will be the second major poll to reflect the impact of the sexting flap. A NBC 4 New York/Wall Street Journal/Marist College conducted in the immediate aftermath of revelations Weiner continued having explicit online communications with women after his 2011 resignation from Congress showed he had dropped nine points and lost his lead. 

Quinnipiac's last poll on the race was released Wednesday and was conducted just prior to the scandal spending days dominating the headlines. It showed Weiner in first place with 26 percent  compared to 22 percent for City Council Speaker Christine Quinn and 20 percent for former Comptroller Bill Thompson. 

In an interview on Fox News Saturday, Rep Steve King (R-IA) said many of his colleagues in Congress are "standing by" him after he claimed many immigrants brought to the U.S. as children are drug smugglers. 

"My colleagues are standing by me. They come up to me constantly," King said.

King implied his colleagues were expressing their support "privately."

"Is the description such that they have to go out to the press and do a press conference? Or can they come and tell me, 'I know you're right, I support you.' They can do that privately," he said.

King made his initial comments in an interview with the conservative site Newsmax that was published July 18.

"Some of them are valedictorians, and their parents brought them in," King said of the immigrants."For everyone who's a valedictorian, there's another 100 out there that weigh 130 pounds and they’ve got calves the size of cantaloupes because they're hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert,”

 

Secretary of State John Kerry issued a statement Saturday after at least 65 people were killed and over 1,000 were injured in Egypt during clashes between security forces, armed men, and protesters demonstrating against the ouster of former President Mohammed Morsi.  

Kerry said he spoke with Egypt's Interim Vice President Mohamed ElBaradei and Interim Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy Saturday morning to express "our deep concern about the bloodshed." He also described the situation as a "pivotal moment for Egypt" and called for an "independent and impartial inquiry into the events of the last day."

Read Kerry's full statement below:

"I spoke this morning with Interim Vice President Mohamed ElBaradei, Interim Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy, and European Union High Representative Catherine Ashton and expressed our deep concern about the bloodshed and violence in Cairo and Alexandria over the past 24 hours that has claimed the lives of scores of Egyptian demonstrators and injured more than 1,000 people.


I want to convey our deepest sympathies to the families of those who lost their lives as well as those who were injured.


This is a pivotal moment for Egypt.


Over two years ago, a revolution began. Its final verdict is not yet decided, but it will be forever impacted by what happens right now.


In this extremely volatile environment, Egyptian authorities have a moral and legal obligation to respect the right of peaceful assembly and freedom of expression. Both are essential components of the inclusive democratic process they have publicly embraced.


Violence not only further sets back the process of reconciliation and democratization in Egypt, but it will negatively impact regional stability.


At this critical juncture, it is essential that the security forces and the interim government respect the right of peaceful protest, including the ongoing sit-in demonstrations.


The United States urges an independent and impartial inquiry into the events of the last day, and calls on all of Egypt’s leaders across the political spectrum to act immediately to help their country take a step back from the brink.


An inclusive political process is needed that achieves as soon as possible a freely and fairly elected government committed to pluralism and tolerance.


The Egyptians who poured into Tahrir Square in 2011 and 2013 themselves called for this outcome for their country’s future and for their aspirations.


A meaningful political dialogue, for which interim government officials have themselves called, requires participants who represent all the political parts of Egyptian society.


To enable such a dialogue, the United States reiterates our call for an end to politicized detentions and the release of political leaders consistent with the law."

A 9-year-old girl was in stable condition and expected to survive after she was accidentally shot by her 5-year-old brother Friday night in Oakdale, Minn.

Police said the girl was shot in the chest with a .22 caliber rifle. The names of the children were not released.

According to the police, adults were in the home at the time of the shooting. Police are investigating how the boy picked up the rifle and whether it was improperly stored.

Former Louisiana Rep. Lindy Boggs died of natural causes Saturday at her home in Maryland, her daughter, ABC's Cokie Roberts said. 

Boggs, a Democrat, served in Congress from 1973 until 1991. In 1997, President Bill Clinton made her U.S. Ambassador to the Vatican. She held that position until 2001. 

Boggs' House career began after she won a 1973 special election to succeed her husband, Thomas Hale Boggs Sr., after his plane was lost while flying over Alaska. Prior to entering Congress, Boggs ran several of her husband's campaigns and worked to support the Civil Rights Acts of 1965 and 1968.

A man was killed by police a SWAT team after he allegedly shot and killed six other people at an apartment building in Hialeah, Fla. early Saturday morning.

Police said they initially tried to negotiate with the gunman, who was holding two hostages at the time the SWAT officers stormed the building. 

Two of the victims were the building manager and her husband. The pair's daughter said she believed the incident began after the shooter confronted her parents about a complaint that had been made about him. 

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