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Esme Cribb

Esme Cribb is a newswriter for TPM in New York City. She can be found on Twitter @emquiry and reached by email at esme@talkingpointsmemo.com.

Articles by Esme

Conservative publisher Matt Drudge on Tuesday claimed he “had dinner” with President Donald Trump “a few weeks ago” and said Trump is already fired up about running for re-election in 2020.

“He was optimistic, engaged, on top of the world, loving the job,” Drudge tweeted. “Time to call out Michael Wolff and his fabricated bullshit!”

He tweeted a link to a report by the Hill about author Michael Wolff’s claim that Trump “does not want to be the President.”

“He was in fine form,” Drudge claimed, referring to Trump. “And already talking about his 2020 re-election run!”

The White House did not immediately respond to TPM’s request for further details about Trump’s and Drudge’s encounter.

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The American Civil Liberties Union on Monday said Democrats who voted in favor of a short-term government funding bill without restoring protections for undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children “betrayed our American values and allowed bigotry and fear to prevail.”

“Enough is enough. We cannot rely on empty promises from those who have already proven to play politics with the lives of Dreamers,” Lorella Praeli, the ACLU’s director of immigration policy and campaigns, said in a statement, referring to immigrants protected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Praeli said that “too many Democrats” voted with Republicans to reopen the government.

“But too many lives are on the line and too much is at stake to give up on this fight,” she said. “Let it be known — we will be watching, and will make sure voters this November know if their representatives stood for Dreamers or for their deportations.”

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White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders is scheduled to give a press briefing at 2 p.m. ET on Monday. Watch live below:

President Donald Trump mimics Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s accent when discussing the deployment of U.S. military resources in Afghanistan, the Washington Post reported on Sunday.

The Washington Post reported, citing unnamed senior administration officials, that Trump “has been known” to imitate an Indian accent and refer to Modi’s remark during a meeting last year that no country has ever “given so much away for so little in return” as the United States has with regard to Afghanistan.

The White House did not immediately respond to TPM’s questions about why Trump might feel the need to imitate Modi’s accent during discussions of unrelated policy.

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President Donald Trump on Monday claimed that Democrats “have shut down our government” because they “are powerless” to resist the demands of their base.

“They don’t want to do it but are powerless!” Trump tweeted.

He claimed that Democrats “are turning down services and security for citizens in favor of services and security for non-citizens.”

“Not good!” he tweeted.

Trump also quote-tweeted a post from Sunday where he urged Senate Republicans to change the chamber’s rules and “go to 51% (Nuclear Option) and vote on real, long term budget.”

As the government shutdown continued for a third day on Monday, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders blamed both Democratic and Republican lawmakers for “not paying attention” to what Trump wants from funding negotiations.

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Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) on Sunday blamed President Donald Trump’s inability to “take yes for an answer” and strike a deal with Senate Democrats to solve the ongoing government shutdown.

Schumer said he “essentially agreed to give the President something he wants in exchange for something we both want” during a meeting on Friday.

“The President picked a number for a wall,” Schumer said, referring to Trump’s proposed wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. “I accepted it.”

After meeting with Trump on Friday, Schumer said that he floated the idea of funding the wall in exchange for continued protection for undocumented immigrants covered by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Schumer on Sunday said his accord with Trump “was only tentative, no handshakes,” and ultimately did not prevent the government shutdown.

“It all really stems from the President, whose inability to clinch a deal has created the Trump shutdown,” Schumer said. “He can’t take yes for an answer. That’s why we’re here.”

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House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) on Sunday said the House will pass a short-term spending bill to keep the government funded through the first week of February if the Senate manages to pass it.

“We’ve agreed that we would accept that in the House,” Ryan said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” “And so we will see sometime today whether or not they have the votes for that.”

Asked whether he plans to run for reelection in 2018, Ryan said, “I’m not going to share my thinking with you before I even talk to my wife.”

“I have no plans of going anywhere anytime soon,” he added.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on Sunday pushed back on President Donald Trump’s suggestion that Senate Republicans should change the chamber’s rules to pass a long-term spending bill with 51 votes if negotiations remain fruitless.

“The Republican Conference opposes changing the rules on legislation,” a spokesperson for McConnell told TPM in an email.

Trump on Sunday urged Senate Republicans to “go to 51%” if negotiations regarding the ongoing government shutdown remain in a stalemate.

Meanwhile, the White House blamed Senate Democrats for the shutdown, while Democrats blamed Republicans, who control both chambers of Congress and the White House, for their failure to strike a deal.

This post has been updated.

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The White House and members of Congress on Sunday each blamed the other for the ongoing government shutdown, amid a conspicuous lack of negotiations two days in.

The White House blamed Senate Democrats.

“I had no idea that the Democrats in the Senate were this dysfunctional,” Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

Marc Short, the White House director of legislative affairs, claimed on ABC News’ “This Week” that “Democrats are forcing the shutdown.”

Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL) blamed the White House.

“They hammered out an agreement and Chuck Schumer made major concessions,” Durbin said on NBC News’ “Meet the Press,” referring to Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY). “Within two hours the White House called and said the deal is off.”

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY), on the other hand, said on CNN, “I think the blame game is ridiculous on both sides.”

Paul on Friday night voted against a short-term spending bill that would have kept the government open for three weeks.

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President Donald Trump on Sunday pushed for Senate Republicans to use the “nuclear option” and change the chamber’s rules to pass a spending bill with a simple majority if congressional deadlock continues while the government is shut down.

“If stalemate continues, Republicans should go to 51% (Nuclear Option) and vote on real, long term budget, no C.R.’s!” Trump tweeted.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) on Saturday said that Trump had “not called” him to negotiate.

“They say they’re not negotiating. That’s foolish,” Schumer said. “We haven’t heard from them.”

Also on Saturday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) announced that the Senate will vote Monday at 1 a.m. on a short-term spending bill that would fund the government for three weeks.

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