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Dylan Scott

Dylan Scott is a reporter for Talking Points Memo. He previously reported for Governing magazine in Washington, D.C., and the Las Vegas Sun. His work has been recognized with a 2013 American Society of Business Publication Editors award for Best Feature Series and a 2010 Associated Press Society of Ohio award for Best Investigative Reporting. He can be reached at dylan@talkingpointsmemo.com.

Articles by Dylan

There is a subplot in the ongoing saga of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling and his alleged racism, one that involves his much-younger girlfriend as well as his wife of more than 50 years.

It's sordid and ugly, but it helps to reveal the other side of Sterling: Not only does he appear to hold racially backward views, but he is also apparently something of a sexual libertine with extremely unpleasant thoughts to share about women.

Sterling's attitude about the women in his life made an appearance in the audio recording that exploded over the weekend. He allegedly instructed V. Stiviano, his younger girlfriend, to avoid appearing in public and at Clippers' games with black people. In a more extensive version of the tape published by Deadspin, the voice alleged to be Sterling also let Stiviano know exactly how much she means to him.

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Threats made against Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) are being investigated by federal law enforcement, Politico reported Monday, citing "people familiar with the matter."

Politico's sources said that threats were made against Reid following his numerous criticisms of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy and his backers, who he described as "domestic terrorists." Reid's security detail has been increased as a result, the report said.

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For years, the NAACP's Los Angeles chapter maintained a mutually beneficial but head-scratching relationship with Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling.

But the civil rights organization was finally forced to confront Sterling's alleged transgressions this weekend when reports of racially charged remarks exploded from the gossip website TMZ.

Leon Jenkins, president of the chapter, gave a statement and fielded questions Monday at a press conference in California, attempting to explain why his branch of National Association for the Advancement of Colored People had been planning to give Sterling a lifetime achievement award, despite the basketball team owner's history of alleged racist behavior.

Jenkins' tone was strikingly defensive, asserting that he didn't know whether it was really Sterling whose voice could be heard making racist statements on audio recordings that became public on Saturday. Jenkins also left the door open for future collaborations with the Clippers owner if Sterling proved penitent.

"There is a personal, economical and social price that Mr. Sterling must pay for his attempt to turn on racial relations," Jenkins said in his opening statement.

The chapter also plans to return Sterling's recent donations to the group, Jenkins said, though he declined to disclose how much the owner had given, saying only that it was "not a significant amount."

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The NAACP's national office told TPM on Monday there clearly needs to be a better vetting process for awards given out by its local chapters after its Los Angeles branch was embarrassed into withdrawing an award it planned to give to basketball team owner Donald Sterling.

The comments came after Sterling, who owns the Los Angeles Clippers, was reportedly caught on audio making racially charged remarks.

Contacted by TPM about why Sterling was being given a lifetime achievement award in the first place, a spokesman at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's national office said that it is "in the process of developing specific guidelines for selecting recipients moving forward."

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Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy is a registered Republican, as the New York Times reported alongside his inflammatory remarks on slavery. Many prominent conservatives had voiced sympathy for his cause as Bundy battled the Bureau of Land Management.

Potential 2016 presidential contenders Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) and Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R) criticized the federal authorities opposing Bundy. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) drove up to the Bundy ranch to stand alongside him. Republican state lawmakers gave impassioned defenses of the armed militia that backed the 67-year-old rancher. Fox News personalities vigorously covered the proceedings and brought Bundy on their shows.

But now that Bundy's racial sentiments have been exposed, forcing the right to ostracize him as best they can, Republicans have re-directed their anger at those who might point out that the man who openly wondered if blacks had been "better off slaves" is one of their own.

They fumed that it had become just another excuse to denigrate conservatives.

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For about 20 minutes Thursday afternoon, Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy restated his views on race in America.

The press conference, originally expected to announce legal action against the Bureau of Land Management, instead featured Bundy offering a sort of stream-of-conscience take on the reaction to his comments about black people and slavery. He made no apology, and instead used part of his time to scold the media for its coverage of him.

He stood on a makeshift outdoor stage decked with American flags, with supporters occasionally shouting their approval of him. At the end of the event, a few supporters cursed and yelled at the reporters. Bundy, meanwhile, continued sharing thoughts on "the Negro community" in comments that tracked with the attempted clarification Bundy had given to conservative radio hosts throughout the day.

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