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Dylan Scott

Dylan Scott is a reporter for Talking Points Memo. He previously reported for Governing magazine in Washington, D.C., and the Las Vegas Sun. His work has been recognized with a 2013 American Society of Business Publication Editors award for Best Feature Series and a 2010 Associated Press Society of Ohio award for Best Investigative Reporting. He can be reached at dylan@talkingpointsmemo.com.

Articles by Dylan

UPDATE: 4:05 p.m. In an unexpected twist, Kobach's office is ordering election officials to send out overseas military ballots without a Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate. His office would not say, however, what would happen next if the state Democratic Party eventually nominated a new candidate, as Kobach has said they should.

More here.

After his Thursday defeat at the Kansas Supreme Court, Secretary of State Kris Kobach unveiled a new plan to make sure a Democratic candidate is on the ballot in the state's Senate race. He would push back the mailing date for ballots sent to overseas military members and argue under state law that Democrats must name somebody to replace withdrawn nominee Chad Taylor.

But to move the mailing date for overseas military ballots from Sept. 20 to Sept. 27, as Kobach said Thursday that he would, he would need federal approval. And as of Friday afternoon, federal officials told TPM, he hasn't sought it.

The federal MOVE Act requires state election officials to send ballots to overseas military voters 45 days before the election. That would be Sept. 20 this year. States are, however, allowed to request a waiver if an "undue hardship" resulting from a legal contest arises -- and election law experts say that this circumstance would likely qualify.

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The day after the Kansas Supreme Court ruled that the Democratic Senate nominee should be removed from the November ballot, Rasmussen is out with a new poll showing independent candidate Greg Orman ahead of incumbent Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS) by five points in a head-to-head race.

Orman leads Roberts among likely voters 45 percent to 40 percent without Democratic nominee Chad Taylor on the ballot, according to Rasmussen. The question of whether another Democrat will be on the ballot is still to be resolved, but the poll is further evidence that Orman fares much better if he doesn't have to contend with a Democratic candidate.

When Rasmussen gave respondents a choice among all three candidates, Taylor received 9 percent of the vote and Roberts held a slight edge over Orman, 39 percent to 38 percent.

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Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach (R) isn't backing down after the state Supreme Court blocked him from keeping Democratic Senate nominee Chad Taylor on the November ballot. He is now demanding that the Democratic Party select a new candidate, arguing that state law requires it.

What Kansas Democrats are actually going to do, though, remains unclear. If, as is widely believed, Taylor's withdrawal was a ploy by the party to funnel Democratic voters to independent candidate Greg Orman and unseat long-time incumbent Republican Sen. Pat Roberts, naming a new nominee doesn't make much sense. But Kobach seems intent on forcing the issue.

A spokesperson for Kobach confirmed to TPM that he believed state law required the party to fill the vacancy. He said he would consider suing the Democratic Party to compel them to name a replacement if they didn't do it on their own.

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The Kansas Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Democratic Senate nominee Chad Taylor's name should be removed from the ballot in November, overruling Secretary of State Kris Kobach (R).

The much-anticipated ruling in one of the most-watched Senate races of 2014 means national Democrats are closer to their perceived goal of clearing the field for independent candidate Greg Orman. Polling suggests that Orman, who had briefly run as a Democrat in 2008 and is open to caucusing with either party, is better positioned to knock off the vulnerable Republican incumbent Sen. Pat Roberts.

But the matter might not be fully resolved.

After the ruling, Kobach quickly moved to put another obstacle in the way of Democrats' plan. Kobach reiterated his position that the Democratic Party is required under state law to replace Taylor on the ballot. He said he had notified the party chair that Taylor should be replaced and moved the mailing date for ballots from Sept. 20 to Sept. 27 to give Democrats time to pick a new nominee.

Election law expert Rick Hasen said on his blog that Kobach would likely have to sue the Democratic Party to force it to replace Taylor. A Democratic Party spokesperson did not immediately respond to TPM's request for comment.

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Almost simultaneously, BuzzFeed and Politico published extensive stories Wednesday on what they described as the troubled leadership of Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

The Politico story in particular was full of anecdotes from Democratic insiders wielding shivs: She's tone deaf and tried to use party money to pay for her own clothes. She's grasping and more concerned with her own personal ambitions than the fate of the party. She's so relentlessly self-promotional that even President Barack Obama has grown tired of her -- and he lets it show.

Some folks within the Democratic Party are clearly dissatisfied with her leadership. But who exactly has their knives out for Wasserman Schultz? And what's their angle? That's a little more opaque.

What we do know, though, is that some kind of change could be coming to the DNC very soon. The party is expected to have a presidential frontrunner after the new year -- when presumed nominee Hillary Clinton has said she'll make her decision about whether to run -- and presidential candidates tend to want their own people at the top of the party. It might not be normal for a not-yet-nominated candidate to get their pick of party chair (and publicly, she surely won't), but nothing is normal about the potential Clinton 2016 bid. And combined with the attacks on Wasserman Schultz, it certainly seems that a new chair is not to be ruled out.

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Arizona Cardinals running back Jonathan Dwyer was reportedly arrested Wednesday for alleged domestic violence.

The news comes after Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice was suspended indefinitely after a video surfaced of him hitting his wife and Minnesota Vikings All-Pro running back Adrian Peterson was indicted on child injury charges.

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The Alaska Senate race is ostensibly all about which candidate -- incumbent Democratic Sen. Mark Begich or Republican challenger Dan Sullivan -- is the truer Alaskan. Which might help explain why the campaigns spent most of the day on Wednesday arguing about snowmobiles.

First, Sullivan's campaign released a TV ad in which a professional snowmobiler accused Begich of "pretending" to ride a snowmobile in one of his own ads. Then Begich called the Sullivan ad a lie, alleging that the shoot for his ad had a crew member with an AR-15 to protect against polar bears and was cold enough to induce frostbite in Begich himself.

Because nothing is truer Alaska than polar bears and frostbite.

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Rep. Cory Gardner (R-CO) is running dead even with Democratic incumbent Sen. Mark Udall in the Colorado Senate race, according to a new poll.

The USA Today/Suffolk University poll showed Gardner at 43 percent and Udall at 42 percent. The margin of error is 4.4 points.

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Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson testified Tuesday to the St. Louis County grand jury that is investigating whether he should be charged in the shooting death of Michael Brown, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported.

Wilson testified for nearly four hours, according to the newspaper, which cited "a source with knowledge of the investigation."

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