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Dylan Scott

Dylan Scott is a reporter for Talking Points Memo. He previously reported for Governing magazine in Washington, D.C., and the Las Vegas Sun. His work has been recognized with a 2013 American Society of Business Publication Editors award for Best Feature Series and a 2010 Associated Press Society of Ohio award for Best Investigative Reporting. He can be reached at dylan@talkingpointsmemo.com.

Articles by Dylan

Obamacare's second enrollment period hasn't attracted nearly the media attention that the first did -- probably because the federal HealthCare.gov hasn't been the abject disaster it was in the opening days of 2014.

To wit: the Obama administration reported on Wednesday that 462,000 people had signed up for private health insurance through the federal website in the first week of 2015 open enrollment, which started Nov. 15.

That dwarfs the 27,000 people who signed up on HealthCare.gov, which serves 30-plus states, during the entire first month of enrollment last year.

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A St. Louis County grand jury has decided not to indict Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson for the Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown, and everyone is now trying to figure out what that means.

Brown's death, which surfaced the deeply burrowed and difficult-to-reconcile tensions that in some ways define our nation's history, seems too visceral, too revealing to be without consequence.

But that might be the deep fear that hides behind the second-guessing of the grand jury: No indictment is, as some have said, an indictment of the system. And what if that system is too difficult to change?

"I just think the institutions have to be looked at," Eugene O'Donnell, a former police officer and prosecutor who is now a lecturer at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at City University of New York, told TPM on Tuesday. "The titillating gotcha stuff, that's unfortunately what dominates the news. The real issues are profoundly more complicated."

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Law enforcement has released pictures of Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson after he shot Michael Brown, following the grand jury's decision Monday not to indict Wilson.

Prosecutor Bob McCulloch said that some witnesses said Brown had punched Wilson, and McCulloch said that Wilson had some swelling and redness on his face.

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Part of Michael Brown's mother Lesley McSpadden's reaction to the news that a St. Louis County grand jury would not indict Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson for shooting her son Michael Brown was caught on tape.

St. Louis alderman Antonio French, who has frequently been present on the ground in Ferguson since the Aug. 9 shooting, posted a brief video of Brown's mother's reaction after the announcement.

"They still don't care," McSpadden, identified by French in his post, said. "They ain't never gon' care."

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In announcing Monday that Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson would not be charged in the Aug. 9 death of Michael Brown, St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch provided the most detailed account yet of what led to the shooting and the shooting itself.

McCulloch emphasized that the grand jury had heard from witnesses who had not spoken to the press and reviewed the entirety of the physical evidence. "They are the only people who have heard and examined every witness and every piece of evidence," he said.

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A St. Louis County grand jury has decided not to indict Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson on any criminal charges in the Aug. 9 shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

The nationally televised announcement is the climax to a story that has captivated the nation and amplified racial tensions, with fierce clashes between protesters and police in a majority black town with a largely white police force. The incident and its aftermath resurfaced America's long complicated history with race, violence, and law enforcement.

St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch began the announcement with a detailed explanation of the investigation, at times criticizing the media's "insatiable appetite" in following the case and "non-stop rumors on social media."

"The duty of the grand jury is to separate fact from fiction," he said. "They are the only people who have heard and examined every witness and every piece of evidence."

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