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Daniel Strauss

Daniel Strauss is a reporter for Talking Points Memo. He was previously a breaking news reporter for The Hill newspaper and has written for Politico, Roll Call, The American Prospect, and Gaper's Block. He has also interned at Democracy: A Journal of Ideas and The New Yorker. Daniel grew up in Chicago and graduated from the University of Michigan with a B.A. in History. At Michigan he helped edit Consider, a weekly opinion magazine. He can be reached at daniel@talkingpointsmemo.com.

Articles by Daniel

Law enforcement officials on Friday announced the composite sketch of a person suspected to have been closely involved in the bombing of the NAACP office in Colorado Springs, though they are still reluctant to ascribe a motive to the incident.

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As the minority party in the 114th Congress, Senate Democrats are staking out specific policy areas to direct most of their focus.

Now that they no longer have a majority in either chamber, they're stuck with either blocking the Republican agenda or staking out positions of their own. Several key lawmakers have begun doing that.

"It's a smart way to bring new voices to the leadership table," Doug Thornell, a former top advisor to Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) and former deputy political director at the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee told TPM. "It also helps with accountability. It also helps people feel like they do have a role and that they're part of the team, rather than a top down leadership structure."

READ: Progressives Seek Control Of The Democratic Party Here are five policy areas and the Democrats who are going to have a laser focus on them going forward:

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When Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL) took to his chamber's floor on Wednesday he warned that the now minority Senate Democrats "had no intention of just rolling over" but added that the "gratuitous obstruction and wanton filibustering" of Republicans in the last Congress wouldn't be something Democrats would mimic now, pointing toward a big question about the 114th Congress.

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