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Caitlin MacNeal

Caitlin MacNeal is a News Writer based in Washington, D.C. Before joining TPM, Caitlin interned and wrote for the Huffington Post, the Sunlight Foundation and Slate. She is a graduate of Georgetown University.

Articles by Caitlin

A conservative group in North Carolina filed a lawsuit Monday against the North Carolina state Board of Elections seeking to delay its certification of the 2016 elections until it has gone through the lengthy process of verifying the addresses of voters who registered to vote on the same day they voted.

The lawsuit comes as the sitting governor refuses to concede his defeat. Republican Gov. Pat McCrory trails Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper by some 5,000 votes. McCrory is claiming widespread voter fraud and is challenging ballots in dozen of counties as he tries to close the gap with Cooper.

McCory is under pressure from Democrats to concede. The new lawsuit, while not focused solely on the governor's race, could buy McCory more time by postponing the official certification of the results until well into December.

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Following several reports laying out the potential conflicts of interest Donald Trump could have as president given his real estate holdings around the world, the President-elect dismissed concerns and said that voters knew about his business before the election.

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During a meeting with leaders of the Brexit movement following the election, Donald Trump asked them to push back against offshore wind farms like the one that can be seen from his golf course in Scotland, according to reports in the New York Times and British paper The Express.

Trump has been fighting a wind farm off of the coast of Aberdeen for a while since the turbines can be seen from his golf course in Aberdeenshire, but he lost a court battle in December 2015.

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Kellyanne Conway, Donald Trumps former campaign manager, on Tuesday evening dismissed reports that during an off-the-record meeting with television networks, Trump went off on the media and their coverage of him.

"That’s not true at all. I sat right to his left. He did not explode in anger," Conway told Bloomberg Politics' "With All Due Respect" when asked if Trump exploded in anger at the meeting.

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UPDATE: Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016, 10:04 a.m. ET: Hope Hicks, a spokeswoman for Donald Trump's transition team, told reporters that the President-elect's meeting with the New York Times is back on, according to a President-elect pool report. Times spokeswoman Eileen Murphy also issued a statement to the pool saying that the meeting will take place.

"Mr. Trump's staff has told us that the President Elect's meeting with The Times is on again. He will meet with our publisher off-the-record and that session will be followed by an on-the-record meeting with our journalists and editorial columnists," Murphy said in the statement.

ORIGINAL STORY:

Early Tuesday morning, Donald Trump published tweets announcing that he had cancelled a meeting with the New York Times set for Tuesday.

The President-elect claimed that the paper changed the conditions of the meeting and railed against the Times' coverage of him.

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Retired Gen. Michael Flynn is known for his focus on Islamic extremism and anti-Muslim sentiments, as well as a combative management style, yet he has come out against torture several times, arguing that using controversial interrogation techniques hurts the United States, according to comments surfaced by CNN on Monday.

CNN uncovered statements Flynn has made between 2014 and 2016 expressing wariness about the United States' use of interrogation techniques like waterboarding, which many have argued constitutes torture.

"I'll tell you what, I think it's very dangerous for a time, because it exposes the United States to something that we -- I think history will look back on it and it won't be a pretty picture, regardless of all the people that you have heard in the media, what they have said," Flynn said at a Carnegie Council event in December 2014, according to CNN.

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Several Republican North Carolina state lawmakers are shooting down rumors that the legislature could expand the number of seats on the state Supreme Court, allowing Republican Gov. Pat McCrory (R) to appoint Republicans to those seats and flip the state's top court back to Republican control.

Democrats won back a majority on the court on Election Day, and McCrory appears poised to lose his re-election bid to Democratic state Attorney General Roy Cooper, prompting reports that Republicans could use a special session to pack the court before McCrory leaves office.

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President Obama said on Sunday that while he will respect Donald Trump when he takes office, but he suggested that if Trump's plans or actions go against certain "values" and "ideals," he may speak up.

"I want to be respectful of the office and give the President-elect an opportunity to put forward his platform and his arguments without somebody popping off in every instance," Obama said at a press conference in Lima, Peru, talking about his post-presidency plans.

"As an American citizen who cares deeply about our country, if there are issues that have less to do with the specifics of some legislative proposal or battle but go to core questions about our values and our ideals, and if I think that it is necessary or helpful for me to defend those ideals, I’ll examine it when it comes," the President added.

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Donald Trump told reporters on Sunday that while he plans on moving into the White House in January, his wife, Melania Trump, and youngest son, Barron Trump, will not join him right away.

Trump told reporters outside his golf resort in Bedminster, New Jersey, that his wife and son would join him "very soon" but after Barron Trump is "finished with school," according to the President-elect pool report.

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Reince Priebus, who will serve as Donald Trump's chief of staff, on Sunday appeared open to the administration creating a registry of visitors and immigrants from certain countries.

"I’m not gonna rule out anything, but we’re not gonna have a registry based on a religion," Priebus said on NBC's "Meet the Press" when asked if Trump would set up a Muslim registry.

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