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Caitlin MacNeal

Caitlin MacNeal is a News Writer based in Washington, D.C. Before joining TPM, Caitlin interned and wrote for the Huffington Post, the Sunlight Foundation and Slate. She is a graduate of Georgetown University.

Articles by Caitlin

Rep. Steve King (R-IA), a vocal opponent of gay marriage, has a few ideas on how conservatives should react to the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage, including impeaching some of the justices.

During a Tuesday appearance on Jan Mickelson's Iowa radio show "Mickelson in the Morning," a caller suggested that Congress impeach some of the Supreme Court justices. King agreed, mentioning that both Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Justice Elena Kagan have performed same-sex marriages.

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A brewery outside of Chicago cut ties with Donald Trump and renamed one of its beers following the reality-TV star and Republican presidential candidate's remarks calling Mexican immigrants "rapists" and drug dealers.

Andres Araya, the Latino co-owner of the 5 Rabbit Cerveceria brewery told Chicago radio station WBEZ that he would stop making beer for Trump Tower's Rebar.

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After the district judge in Midland County, Mich., decided to stop performing any marriages in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage, county clerk Ann Manary started performing the ceremonies herself.

"Our district court is no longer performing marriages," Manary told MLive.com. "I'm not sure exactly what he's thinking there."

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Now that the Supreme Court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry, the attorney general and governor of Mississippi are butting heads over how to proceed.

The Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood (D) on Tuesday asked a federal appeals court to allow his office to withdraw as counsel to Gov. Phil Bryant (R) in the case regarding the state's ban on same-sex marriage, according to Buzzfeed News.

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Ahead of a town hall event in Iowa on Tuesday, presidential candidate and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) asked for questions on Twitter with the #AskBobby hashtag, and the move predictably backfired on the presidential candidate.

The Believe Again PAC indicated that Jindal would answer some of the questions at the town hall event, but it was not clear on Wednesday morning whether the governor addressed any of the questions asked on Twitter.

Twitter users took the opportunity to ask Jindal ridiculous questions about dinosaurs and "Duck Dynasty" and mock his political positions.

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This post has been updated.

The fire at a historically black church in Greeleyville, S.C. on Tuesday night was likely not a case of arson, a federal law enforcement official told the Associated Press on Wednesday.

Local and federal law authorities are still investigating a fire at Mount Zion AME Church, which was burned down by Ku Klux Klan members in 1995, but federal law enforcement said that the preliminary investigation indicated the fire was not intentionally set.

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Fox News host Megyn Kelly on Tuesday night pressed Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) on his proposal to subject the Supreme Court justices to retention elections after the court ruled in favor of both Obamacare subsidies and gay marriage.

Under Cruz's plan, the justices would be appointed to their post, and face a retention election during the second national election after appointment. They would then face election again every eight years.

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Following a ruling by the Oklahoma Supreme Court ordering the state to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the capitol, the Satanic Temple will change its plans to place a Satanic monument in the capitol as well.

After the state allowed the Ten Commandments monument to be placed at the capitol in 2012, the Satanic Temple announced plans to install its own statue and the group began working on a sculpture of a Baphomet, a goat-headed deity.

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The Oklahoma Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled that the state must remove a controversial Ten Commandments monument from the capitol in Oklahoma City, the Tulsa World reported.

The court decided that the monument violates the state constitution because it supports a religion and ordered its removal in a 7-2 vote, according to the Tulsa World.

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LiveWire