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Caitlin MacNeal

Caitlin MacNeal is a News Writer based in Washington, D.C. Before joining TPM, Caitlin interned and wrote for the Huffington Post, the Sunlight Foundation and Slate. She is a graduate of Georgetown University.

Articles by Caitlin

Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK) on Monday criticized President Obama for his comments about the Benghazi attack and Fox News during his interview with Fox host Bill O'Reilly before the Super Bowl.

"It’s just an outrageous lie, it is kind of hard to call it anything else. It’s kind of like Obamacare. It's kind of like Obamacare and the things he said in the beginning and now he’s denying it,” Inhofe told Oklahoma radio station KFAQ about Obama's claim that his administration did not cover up information on Benghazi.

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Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley (D) talked about his preparation for a potential bid for the White House in 2016 during an interview with the Washington Post published Saturday.

"I have a great deal of respect for Hillary Clinton," he said. "But for my own part, I have a responsibility to prepare and to address the things that I feel a responsibility to address. . . . To squander this important period of preparation because of horse-race concerns and handicapping concerns is just not a very productive use of energy. . . . Right now, I’m going to keep doing what I'm doing — the thought work and the preparation work."

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NBC 6 South Florida (WTVJ) and Florida-based Capitol News Service apologized to Florida Republicans on Friday for a graphic that referred to the GOP as the "Reprehensive Party of Florida," according to the Miami Herald.

Republican Party of Florida Chairman Lenny Curry complained to NBC 6 for showing Republican political ads with the "Reprehensive" label.

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President Obama on Sunday talked about the problems with the health care law's rollout during an interview with Fox News' Bill O'Reilly before the Superbowl.

When asked if telling Americans that they could keep their current health plans was the biggest mistake he has made, Obama addressed his apology for the remark.

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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton supports President Obama in his opposition to new Iran sanctions while world leaders negotiate a nuclear deal, according to a letter she sent to Sen. Carl Levin (D-MI), obtained by Politico.

"I share the opinion of you and many of your colleagues that these sanctions and the carefully constructed global consensus behind them are responsible for driving Tehran to the negotiating table," she wrote. "'The U.S. intelligence community has assessed that imposing new unilateral sanctions now ‘would undermine the prospects for a successful comprehensive nuclear agreement with Iran.' I share that view."

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Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) on Sunday cast some doubt on Congress' ability to pass immigration reform in 2014, even though Republican House leaders are making reform a priority this legislative session.

"That is clearly in doubt. It depends on whether they're willing to actually secure the border, actually have interior enforcement and not -- and agree to not having an amnesty," Ryan said on ABC's "This Week" about working with Senate Democrats. "If we can do that, where it's security first, no amnesty, then we might be able to get somewhere."

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Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) on Sunday weighed in on President Obama's recent comments that he will use executive actions to push his agenda this year.

"We have an increasingly lawless presidency where he is actually doing the job of Congress, writing new policies and new laws without going through Congress. Presidents don't write laws, Congress does," Ryan said on ABC's "This Week."

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New Jersey Assemblyman John Wiesnewski (D), who has helped lead the investigation into the bridge scandal, said on Sunday that the letter from David Wildstein's lawyer claiming that "evidence exists" that ties New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie to the lane closures just "raises questions."

"Well, the question is it's-- the use of the words 'evidence exists,' as opposed to saying, 'I have documents,' or, 'I have an e-mail.' It's a curious choice of words, which maybe he knows somebody else that has information. Maybe this is a conversation he had. Maybe this is something else that is not within the scope of the subpoena the committee issued," Wisniewski said on NBC's "Meet the Press." "What does he have and why doesn't the committee have it?"

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