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Here are the line-ups for the Sunday talk shows this weekend:

• ABC, This Week: Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten, D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee.

• CBS, Face The Nation: Senate candidate Joe Miller (R-AK), Rep. Kendrick Meek (D-FL), Gov. Haley Barbour (R-MS), Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL).

• CNN, State Of The Union: Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Shaun Donovan, Gov. Charlie Crist (I-FL), Rep. Kendrick Meek (D-FL).

• Fox News Sunday: Glenn Beck.

• NBC, Meet The Press: Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-LA), New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu (D), Brad Pitt.

1||August 29, 2010 marks the five-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina's devastation of New Orleans, LA. Here are some pictures that show how the Gulf Coast region has -- and hasn't -- been rebuilt since then...

The lower 9th ward of New Orleans, shot on August 8, 2010.||Newscom/Sipa&&

2||The lower 9th ward, shot in September, 2005.||Newscom/Sipa&&

3||The corner of Dahlia and Bay in the lower 9th Ward, shot on August 8, 2010. ||Newscom/Sipa&&

4||Dahlia and Bay, shot on August 29, 2005.||Newscom/Sipa&&

5||Claiborne Ave., a major road leading into downtown New Orleans, shot on August 8, 2010.||Newscom/Sipa&&

6||Claiborne Ave. shot on September 5, 2005.||Newscom/Sipa&&

7||Forstall Street, at the intersection with N. Johnson St in the lower 9th Ward, shot on August 8, 2010.||Newscom/Sipa&&

8||Forstall Street, shot on September 30, 2005.||Newscom/Sipa&&

9||Cajun Seafood at the intersection of Washington and S. Broad Street, shot on August 8, 2010.||Newscom/Sipa&&

10||Cajun Seafood, shot on September 5, 2005.||Newscom/Sipa&&

11||August 2010: East Biloxi, in south Mississippi.||Newscom/KRT&&

12||August 2010: Lower 9th Ward. ||Newscom/Sipa&&

13||August 2010: A building in the lower 9th Ward. ||Newscom/Sipa&&

14||August 2010: Lower 9th Ward. ||Newscom/Sipa&&

15||August 2010: Merrick cemetery in St. Bernard Parish, LA. FEMA had put recovered remains in temporary coffins, with plans to rebury them as part of the recovery.||Newscom/Sipa&&

16||August 2010: Lower 9th Ward. ||Newscom/Sipa&&

17||August 2010: Lower 9th Ward. This was the house in which musical legend Fats Domino resided at the time of the hurricane, and where he initially decided to ride out the storm. Though some news reports initially indicated that he died in the flooding, he was rescued several days later. It was rebuilt with the help of volunteers, though he lost many of his possessions in the flood and to looting. ||Newscom/Sipa&&

18||August 2010: Lower 9th Ward. The markings on the house indicate that it was searched by rescue crews after the hurricane. The top quadrant is the date of the search; the right quadrant indicates hazards in the home; the bottom quadrant indicates the number of bodies discovered; and the left quadrant indicates the group that performed the search. ||Newscom/Sipa&&

19||August 2010: Lower 9th Ward. ||Newscom/Sipa&&

20||August 2010: Lower 9th Ward. ||Newscom/Sipa&&

21||August 2010: Lower 9th Ward. ||Newscom/Sipa&&

What's at stake in the upcoming battle over the Bush tax cuts? The simple answer is about $700 billion over 10 years. That's a ton of money -- but nowhere near enough to right the country's fiscal course. To really get the budget back in order and the deficit under control, all of Bush's tax cuts would have to go.

They crow about deficits, but Republicans want to make the whole batch permanent, for a total cost of $3.8 trillion over 10 years. Democratic leaders on the Hill and in the White House, however, want to preserve most of the cuts, too, and just let the tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans expire. That would still increase deficits by about $3.1 trillion over 10 years -- not as fiscally responsible as they'd have you believe. Even if Democrats get their way, in other words, there will still be revenue shortfalls as far as the eyes can see.

Take a look at this comparison from CBO.

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As elections officials collect absentee ballots and lawyers descend on Alaska, insurgent Senate candidate Joe Miller has a message for the National Republican Senatorial Committee: Back off.

We've been closely following this Republican primary race, the results of which hang in the balance as Miller leads Sen. Lisa Murkowski by 1,668 votes and she's got nothing to do but wait. But the NRSC sent a lawyer to help Murkowski should voting questions arise as absentee ballots are counted, and a new report surfaced today suggesting the state party was secretly supporting the senator despite a promise to stay neutral.

Miller issued a statement accusing Murkowski of trying to "pull an Al Franken" by lawyering up. He warned the NRSC to stay on the sidelines, saying the party committee is intended to elect Republicans, "not to pick favorites amongst those running, nor is it to send lawyers to try to manipulate the outcome."

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Charlie Crist would not have voted for the Democratic health care reform law had he been in the Senate this year. But, please, don't ask him to say that out loud.

The campaign of GOP Senate nominee Marco Rubio is having a field day with an interview Crist gave to a Florida cable news station this afternoon in which Crist pretty clearly says "I would have voted for it," when asked about the health care law President Obama signed in March. The answer was a flip-flop from Crist's past public opposition to the law first voiced back when he was still a Republican running against Rubio in the primary. (On Crist's campaign website he remains publicly opposed to the law, stating "Had I been in the United States Senate at the time, I would have voted against the bill because of unacceptable provisions like the cuts to the Medicare Advantage program.")

Here's video (clipped by the Rubio camp):

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Just in case you had any doubt -- as it seems some conservatives did -- House Republican leadership is committed to taking every possible step, even symbolic steps, to repeal health care reform.

On Fox News last night, guest host Laura Ingraham pressed GOP Whip Eric Cantor to commit to putting a repeal bill on the floor at the very start of the next Congress if Republicans take the House. Cantor was completely game. "Absolutely I will pledge to do that! Are you kidding? Of course!" he said. But he also acknowledged that, even if Republicans could pass a repeal bill, it would face a veto, so he and his colleagues will take intermediate steps.

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Gov. Chris Christie (R-NJ) has fired his state Education Commissioner Bret Schundler, as a result of errors and misrepresentations from Schundler in a matter costing the state $400 million in federal "Race to the Top" money. At the same time, the firing has been arranged at Schundler's request in such a manner so that Schundler -- a former leading figure of the state GOP's right wing -- will be able to collect unemployment benefits.

The key detail is that Schundler preferred to be fired, rather than submit his resignation. "I asked if they would mind writing a termination letter, instead of a resignation letter, because I do have a mortgage to pay, and I do have a daughter who's just started college," Schundler said, the Star-Ledger reports. "And I, frankly, will need the unemployment insurance benefits until I find another job. ... And they said fine. They said sure."

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Sharron Angle is not disavowing statements she made last year, when she agreed that there are currently "domestic enemies" in Congress.

As Greg Sargent reported on Wednesday, a Democrat unearthed some audio of Angle on a radio show back in October 2009. A caller said: "We have domestic enemies. We have home-born homegrown enemies in our system. And I for one think we have some of those enemies in the walls of the Senate and the Congress."

To which Angle replied: "Yes. I think you're right, Bill."

Then yesterday, Angle appeared on the radio show of conservative talker Heidi Harris, who gave Angle the chance to clarify this notion. Angle didn't say yes -- but she didn't say no, either.

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In their newest case against the already-convicted 20-something Miami arms dealer Efraim Diveroli, the feds accused him this week of using a front company to hide his continuing involvement in the arms trade. But a closer look at Diveroli's recent dealings suggest that, even as he was awaiting sentencing on his initial conviction for selling the U.S. government poor-quality and illegal munitions for use in Afghanistan, Diveroli engaged in a series of transactions designed to obscure his involvement in companies involved in the arms business.

AEY, Inc., the business that Diveroli used a few years back to sell the U.S. Army out-of-date Eastern European munitions, is still around and is run out of Diveroli's upscale home in Miami Beach.

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