This Week In Pictures: Visual Dispatches From BP’s Oil Spill In The Gulf

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May-June, 2010: As oil continues to leak following the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, more pictures are emerging of the clean up efforts in the Gulf Coast.

Here, a Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle is recovered for clean up.

Newscom/KRT

A public beach in Gulf Shores, AL.

Newscom/Zuma

An oil-stained egret in Grand Isle, LA.

Newscom/Zuma

Jeff Phillips, Environmental Contaminants Coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, rescues a Brown Pelican from the Barataria Bay in Grand Isle, LA.

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Ann Marie Gorden.

A Coast Guard crew member looks out at Perdido Pass from the back of a AC-141A plane in Orange Beach, Alabama.

Newscom/Zuma

Members of a Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Team (SCAT) follow a trail of oil debris on the shoreline of Raccoon Island, LA.

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (AW/SW) Jonathen E. Davis

A brown pelican flies passed workers replacing oil soaked boom around Cat Island in Barataria Bay near Grand Isle, LA.

Newscom/Zuma

A Kemp’s Ridley turtle swims out from under an oil patch.

Newscom/KRT

A pelican gets cleaned off by a member of the Louisiana State Wildlife Response Team.

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Justin Stumberg/Released

Two brown pelicans swim in gulf waters near St. Petersburg, FL, after being released at the Egmont Key National Wildlife Refuge.

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nick Ameen.

Brown pelicans await cleaning in a wildlife rehabilitation center in Buras, LA.

Newscom/Zuma

Orange Beach, AL.

Newscom/Zuma

Dolphins surface for air near a shrimp boat skimming for oil in Grand Isle, LA.

Newscom/Zuma

Sea turtle experts clean a small Kemp’s Ridley turtle with a toothbrush.

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by University of California, Davis

The controlled burn of oil from the Deepwater Horizon/BP oil spill

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by Petty Officer First Class John Masson

Members of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service prepare to net an oiled pelican in Barataria Bay, LA.

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class John Miller.

A helicopter flies over shrimp boats skimming for oil in in Grand Isle, LA.

Newscom/Zuma

Oil washed up on the beaches of Ft. Morgan, AL.

Newscom/WENN

Dr. Sharon Taylor of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service releases a northern gannet at the Egmont Key National Wildlife Refuge near St. Petersburg, FL.

Newscom/

A team of sea turtle experts work to recover oiled and endangered turtles in the Gulf.

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nick Ameen.

Marine science technicians examine a previously identified oil impact zone during a shoreline assessment on Grand Terre Island 2, in Grand Isle, LA.

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Caleb Critchfield.

A Containment boom and sorbent boom block a patch of oil from reaching an island populated by brown and white pelicans in Barataria Bay, LA.

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Caleb Critchfield.

Oil damage on the beach at Gulf Islands National Seashore.

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by Tami A. Heilmann-DOI

The oil slick, one mile south of Perdido Key, FL.

cc: Deepwater Horizon Response/Photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Tasha Tully.

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