TPM News

A Kentucky clerk who stopped issuing marriage licenses to all couples – gay or straight – after the Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage now faces a class-action lawsuit filed by the ACLU-Kentucky Thursday.

The challengers in the suit – two gay couples and two straight couples – say Rowan County Clerk Kimberly Davis violated their due process rights under the Fourteenth Amendment and ask that Davis be compelled to begin issuing the licenses again, in addition to seeking compensatory and punitive damages.

They also brought the complaint on behalf of the individuals who are otherwise qualified to be married in Rowan county, but can no longer do so because of Davis' refusal to grant licenses.

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Authorities are exploring pressing charges against associates of suspected Charleston church shooter Dylann Roof, a report by The State suggests.

Unnamed sources tell The State that the investigation has been widened to include Roof's possible associates, who may have known the alleged shooter was planning the June 17 attack, which left nine African Americans dead at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C.

From the report:

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On July 4, 1876, as Americans celebrated the nation’s centennial, rumors of a bloody clash on the frontier began trickling out. Sketchy stories, long on hearsay but short on accurate details, appeared that day in a western paper: George Armstrong Custer, a hero during the Civil War and a minor celebrity in the years since, had, along with hundreds of his subordinates in the Seventh Cavalry, been slaughtered by “Indians” on the banks of the Little Bighorn River in Montana Territory. The first report understated the carnage: “The situation now looks serious.”

Not yet knit together by a reliable communications network, the United States, at moments of crisis, felt like a much larger country in 1876 than it does today. The engagement had actually taken place more than a week earlier, on June 25. Two days after that, Alfred Terry, Custer’s commanding officer, sent a report back east.

But the telegraph line between Montana and Chicago was down, and so the Army high command, visiting the World’s Fair in Philadelphia, only learned of the debacle from a newspaper account just before Terry’s dispatch finally arrived on July 6.

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Real estate mogul and GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump may have had a tough week—having been dropped by a number of major sponsors—but Trump found an unlikely cheerleader in Comedy Central host Larry Wilmore.

"You know, Republican voters, this one time—I’m not going to chastise you, I’m not going to ridicule you,” Wilmore said Thursday. “You keep doing what you’re doing so I can keep doing what I’m doing.”

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