TPM News

Attorney Mary Farren is suing her husband, former Bush White House lawyer John Michael Farren, for $30 million after he allegedly beat her with a flashlight and strangled her in their Connecticut home.

Mary Farren filed the civil suit in Stamford Superior Court last week, according to the Stamford Advocate. She asked the court for a $30 million pre-judgment remedy, saying she can't work because of her injuries.

Police charged John Michael Farren with attempted murder after he allegedly beat his wife and strangled her on Jan. 6, leaving her bleeding and unconscious. Police say she regained consciousness, hit a panic room alarm in their home and then fled to a neighbor's with the couple's two young daughters.

Read More →


January 27, 2010: Members of Congress, the Cabinet, and Supreme Court applaud as President Barack Obama enters the House Chamber to deliver his first State of the Union address.

Pete Souza/whitehouse.gov






Pete Souza/whitehouse.gov




Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) and others applaud.

Pete Souza/whitehouse.gov






Chuck Kennedy/whitehouse.gov




House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel smiles, possibly at Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano taking a snooze.

Newscom/phlphoto




First Lady Michelle Obama waves to the crowd.

Newscom/UPIphotos




House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-OH) (right) reacts to remarks from President Obama alongside Rep. Eric Cantor (R-VA) (center) and Thaddeus McCotter (R-MI).

Newscom/UPIphotos




President Obama shakes hands with Vice President Joe Biden and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) at the conclusion of his State of the Union address.

Pete Souza/whitehouse.gov




Interior Secretary Ken Salazar greets President Obama as he leaves the House Chamber at the conclusion of his State of the Union address. Looking on are, from left, Education Secretary Arne Duncan, Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr., and Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates.

Pete Souza/whitehouse.gov




President Obama greets U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Newscom/UPIphotos




House pages reach to shake hands with President Barack Obama as he leaves the House Chamber.

Chuck Kennedy/whitehouse.gov




President Obama kisses the First Lady in a holding room at the Capitol after delivering his first State of the Union address.

Pete Souza/whitehouse.gov

As I reported yesterday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is planning to move ancillary health care measures through the House, which she hopes will augment comprehensive legislation if and when House and Senate leaders figure out how to move ahead on a bill. One of the issues said to be under consideration was a repeal of the health insurance industry's anti-trust exemptions.

A House source confirms that, the week after next, Pelosi will likely move ahead with legislation to accomplish such a repeal.

Pelosi hinted strongly that such a move was afoot at her weekly press conference this morning.

"We must pass this legislation, and we must take whatever time it takes to do it," Pelosi said. Some things we can do on the side which may not fit into a bigger plan. That doesn't mean that's a substitute for doing comprehensive [reform]. It means we will move on many fronts. Any front we can."

Read More →

In a talk radio interview this morning, Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK) had a peculiar kind of praise for President Barack Obama's first State Of The Union address. Inhofe called Obama the best liar he has ever seen, even better than Bill Clinton, "and I don't mean that unkindly" he said.

Read More →

Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele issued a statement today in response to the Senate's vote to raise the debt ceiling by $1.9 trillion. Here's the full text:

"Last night President Obama attempted to restore his promise to bring a new era of fiscal responsibility to Washington but after a full year of pushing his misguided agenda it is obvious that this new era isn't going to happen on his watch. Today's vote to increase America's debt ceiling is just another example, in a year full of examples, that the president has failed to live up to his promise of responsibility. At a time when millions of Americans are desperately struggling to live within their means and survive this economic recession, the fact the President Obama would team together with Congressional Democrats to increase America's credit card limit is the height of political arrogance and the very definition of irresponsibility. The recent election results should have sent a message to the president, but today's vote makes it clear he is only interested in finding new ways to finance his out-of-control binge spending. President Obama and his liberal allies can rest assured that the American people will send them the ultimate message this November."

Orly Taitz, the dentist and lawyer whose birther lawsuits we've been following, filed a new suit in D.C. District Court Wednesday: Dr. Orly Taitz v. Barack Hussein Obama.

The suit, like Taitz's others, claims President Obama is not a U.S. citizen and demands his birth certificate.

It also alleges that Attorney General Eric Holder has ignored her allegations and calls to the Justice Department -- a "game of hide and seek," she says, that's "infantile at best and treasonous at worst."

Read More →

Deputy Press Secretary Bill Burton responded today to Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito's sour reaction last night to the president's criticism of a recent court decision to strike down a key campaign finance provision, according to a pool report.

"One of the great things about our democracy is that powerful members of the government at high levels can disagree in public and in private," Burton said. "This is one of those cases."

Read More →

LiveWire