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Cheney: CIA Investigation "Offends The Hell Out Of Me," Obama Administration Should Be Asking Us For Advice Appearing on Fox News Sunday, former Vice President Dick Cheney lambasted the Obama administration for investigation CIA interrogation methods, calling it an "outrageous political act." "I guess the other thing that offends the hell out of me, frankly, Chris [Wallace], is we had a track record now of eight years of defending the nation against any further mass casualty attacks from Al Qaeda," said Cheney. "The approach of the Obama administration should be to come to those people who were involved in that policy and say, how did you do it? What were the keys to keeping this country safe over that period of time?"

Kerry: Kennedy Would Fight For Public Option -- But Would Accept A Bill Without It Appearing on This Week, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) said that Ted Kennedy would not have rejected a health care bill that lacked a public option: "He would fight for it, and he would do everything in his power to get it, just like he did for the minimum wage or like he did for children's health care, et cetera. But if he didn't see the ability to be able to get it done, he would not throw the baby out with the bathwater. He would not say no to anything because we have to reduce the cost. We have to make these changes. And he would find the best way forward."

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We now have the lawyers of a former Republican Congressman arguing that the Bush Administration encouraged the Justice Department to leak information on an ongoing probe for "partisan political reasons."

The twist comes in a motion filed Thursday in the case of ex-Rep. Rick Renzi (R-AZ), who was indicted on 36 corruption counts in February 2008. (Read the motion here.)

His lawyers are demanding that the government show why it should not be held in contempt for disclosing information from grand jury proceedings.

The motion lays out the facts we now know, thanks to documents recently released by the House Judiciary Committee, about the White House's apparently successful attempt to secure favorable DOJ leaks on the Renzi probe in the days before the 2006 election.

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This weekend's Republican YouTube address by Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY) -- one of the three key Republicans negotiating on health care -- was a pretty strong sign that negotiations might not be working out after all. Enzi delivered a thorough speech against the Democrats on health care. And even while he did not use the "death panel" phrase itself, he did make the same underlying argument by warning that people could be denied care because of age or disability:



"The bills would expand comparative effectiveness research that would be used to limit or deny care based on age or disability of patients," said Enzi. "Republican amendments in the HELP Committee would have protected Americans by prohibiting the rationing of their health care. The Democrats showed their true intent by voting every amendment down and leaving these unacceptable provisions in the bill. This intrusion of a Washington bureaucrat in the relationship between a doctor and a patient is not the kind of reform that Americans are seeking."

And remember, this guy is one of the key GOPers with whom the Democrats are working, to try to find common ground.

The following is the prepared text of President Obama's eulogy at the funeral mass of Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-MA):

Mrs. Kennedy, Kara, Edward, Patrick, Curran, Caroline, members of the Kennedy family, distinguished guests, and fellow citizens:

Today we say goodbye to the youngest child of Rose and Joseph Kennedy. The world will long remember their son Edward as the heir to a weighty legacy; a champion for those who had none; the soul of the Democratic Party; and the lion of the U.S. Senate - a man whose name graces nearly one thousand laws, and who penned more than three hundred himself.

But those of us who loved him, and ache with his passing, know Ted Kennedy by the other titles he held: Father. Brother. Husband. Uncle Teddy, or as he was often known to his younger nieces and nephews, "The Grand Fromage," or "The Big Cheese." I, like so many others in the city where he worked for nearly half a century, knew him as a colleague, a mentor, and above all, a friend.

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President Obama's eulogy for Sen. Ted Kennedy, as prepared for delivery:

Mrs. Kennedy, Kara, Edward, Patrick, Curran, Caroline, members of the Kennedy family, distinguished guests, and fellow citizens:



Today we say goodbye to the youngest child of Rose and Joseph Kennedy. The world will long remember their son Edward as the heir to a weighty legacy; a champion for those who had none; the soul of the Democratic Party; and the lion of the U.S. Senate - a man whose name graces nearly one thousand laws, and who penned more than three hundred himself.



But those of us who loved him, and ache with his passing, know Ted Kennedy by the other titles he held: Father. Brother. Husband. Uncle Teddy, or as he was often known to his younger nieces and nephews, "The Grand Fromage," or "The Big Cheese." I, like so many others in the city where he worked for nearly half a century, knew him as a colleague, a mentor, and above all, a friend.



Ted Kennedy was the baby of the family who became its patriarch; the restless dreamer who became its rock. He was the sunny, joyful child, who bore the brunt of his brothers' teasing, but learned quickly how to brush it off. When they tossed him off a boat because he didn't know what a jib was, six-year-old Teddy got back in and learned to sail. When a photographer asked the newly-elected Bobby to step back at a press conference because he was casting a shadow on his younger brother, Teddy quipped, "It'll be the same in Washington."



This spirit of resilience and good humor would see Ted Kennedy through more pain and tragedy than most of us will ever know. He lost two siblings by the age of sixteen. He saw two more taken violently from the country that loved them. He said goodbye to his beloved sister, Eunice, in the final days of his own life. He narrowly survived a plane crash, watched two children struggle with cancer, buried three nephews, and experienced personal failings and setbacks in the most public way possible.

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Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY), one of the three Republican negotiators on the Senate Finance Committee, said in the GOP weekly address that bills introduced by Democrats "fail" to lower health care costs and will "raid Medicare."

"We need reforms that will actually lower health care costs for working Americans and we need to make sure we do not increase the deficit and add to the record debt we're already passing on to our children and grandchildren," Enzi said. "The bills introduced by Congressional Democrats fail to meet these standards."

Read the full text after the jump.

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President Obama took his family to longtime vacation spot Martha's Vineyard for seafood, golf, and lots and lots of reading. Here, President Obama steps onto Marine One on August 21. The First Family started their vacation at Camp David before heading to Martha's Vineyard on Sunday, August 23.

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White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs, center, laughs as a gust of air from the president's departing helicopter messes his hair.

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The Obamas disembark Air Force One in Cape Cod, Mass., where they met a Marine helicopter that would take them to Martha's Vineyard.

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President Obama waves to admirers while walking down a fairway at Farm Neck Golf Course on August 24. His playing partner, Dr. Eric Whitaker, is a longtime Chicago friend.

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On August 25, the president interrupted his vacation to announce his nomination of Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, left, to a second term.

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Obama lines up a putt at Mink Meadows Golf Course on August 25.

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The president watches his putt roll towards the hole.

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On his way to pick up lunch at Nancy's Restaurant in Oak Bluffs, Mass., the president greets well-wishers.

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First Lady Michelle Obama brushes sand out of her daughter Malia's hair as an amused Sasha Obama looks on.

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President Obama with daughters Malia (front) and Sasha at Nancy's Restaurant on August 26.

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The president greets employees at Nancy's Restaurant.

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On August 26, President Obama delivers a solemn statement on the death of his friend Sen. Edward Kennedy.

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The Obamas, accompanied by friends, stop their bicycles in the "Lobsterville" section of Martha's Vineyard.

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Sasha Obama (left), along with two young friends, peers from Gay Head Lighthouse in Martha's Vineyard.

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Malia Obama (left), a young friend, and a Secret Service agent stand at the top of Gay Head Lighthouse.

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Friends of the Obamas leave the Gay Head Lighthouse as the president walks out the lower doorway and a Secret Service agent starts down the stairs.

Next week, from Wednesday, Sept. 2 through the weekend, the president will head back to Camp David.

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During his tele-town hall this evening, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) bluntly explained why it is that he's been so eager to have a bipartisan bill, as opposed to a Democrats-only approach.

"People wonder why I have been so persistent in trying to get a bipartisan bill. I've done that because under the rules of the Senate, we're better off if we can do a bill where we can get a little bit of Republican support," said Reid. "The Republican leaders in the Senate, McConnell and Kyl, have said they don't want to do health care reform. The leaders in the House, Boehner and Cantor, have said they don't want to do health care reform. So we have been trying very hard to to get some Republican support for our legislation."

"We only have 60 votes on paper," Reid added, explaining that Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-MA) has passed away, and had not been voting in his final months, and that Sen. Robert Byrd (D-WV) hasn't been voting very much, either. "We only have 58 votes, and is why we need Republican support."

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During a tele-townhall with constituents today, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said he supports a public option...but then he added an extremely important caveat. Reid said he doesn't think the public option ought to be a government run program like Medicare, but instead favors a "private entity that has direction from the federal government so people that don't fall within the parameters of being able to get insurance from their employers, they would have a place to go. "

That sounds suspiciously like Reid would prefer a so-called co-op system, which almost all reformers regard with suspicion, and many regard as a non-starter. Reid is ultimately more than just one vote, too. If the Senate passes a health care bill through the regular legislative process, he'll be the one marrying two different pieces of legislation: one which creates a public option, and one which creates co-ops. Likewise, if the Senate passes health care reforms on a partisan basis through the so-called reconciliation process, his office would take the lead in determining whether to try an include a public option in the reconciliation bill.

I'll update this post when I've received comment from Reid's staff.

Late update: Reid spokesman Jim Manley emails in that Reid's preference is for a "public option," but would not confirm that Reid means "public option" as commonly understood: an insurance program run by the Department of Health and Human Services or another government body.

Late late update: Manley adds, "The govt could contract w a private company to administer the public option. [Sen. Reid] is willing to consider a co-op if he is shown it works to make insurers honest."


On August 27, the nation continued to mourn Senator Edward M. Kennedy as his body was transported from Hyannis Port, MA to the JFK Library in Boston to lie in repose. People crowded along highways and city streets to watch the motorcade, which included the hearse and 85 members of the Kennedy family. Here, Kennedy's flag-draped casket is carried from his Hyannis Port house on Thursday.

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A military escort lifts Kennedy's casket in order to transfer it to a hearse, which was headed for Boston.

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A man waiting for Ted Kennedy's hearse to pass finishes an appreciative sign.

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A supporter along the hearse's route.

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The hearse carrying Ted Kennedy's casket makes its way through Boston.

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Mourners lined up to pay tribute to Ted Kennedy, whose casket arrived Thursday, August 27, at the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum.

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Members of the Kennedy family, with Ted Kennedy's wife Vicki in front, watch his casket pass by on its way into the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum.

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An honor guard carries Ted Kennedy's casket into the museum.

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Vistors line up outside the museum to pay their respects to Ted Kennedy.

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Members of the Kennedy family greet those who came to view the casket.

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Inside the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum.

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Inside the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum.

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A photograph of Ted Kennedy is displayed at the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum.

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Vicki Kennedy, the wife of the late Ted Kennedy, clasps hands with a woman in line to visit the casket.

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Caroline Kennedy, Ted Kennedy's niece, shakes hands with her uncle's well-wishers.

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Mourners wipe their eyes.

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Visitors gather around the Kennedy family burial site in Arlington National Cemetery. Ted Kennedy will be buried next to his brothers John and Robert Kennedy on Saturday, August 29.

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At the Kennedy family burial site.

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