TPM News

Updated: September 2, 2011, 5:05 PM

Conservative columnist Matthew Vadum is just going to come right out and say it: registering the poor to vote is un-American and "like handing out burglary tools to criminals."

"It is profoundly antisocial and un-American to empower the nonproductive segments of the population to destroy the country -- which is precisely why Barack Obama zealously supports registering welfare recipients to vote," Vadum, the author of a book published by World Net Daily that attacks the now-defunct community organizing group ACORN, writes in a column for the American Thinker.

Read More →

The U.S.'s net job creation was zero last month, and now we know of at least one job that was lost this month.

TechCrunch has lost its founder and editor in chief, Michael Arrington, who is stepping down to concentrate on his $20 million AOL-backed tech venture capital fund full time, according to AOL Huffington Post editor-in-chief Arianna Huffington, in an email to The Business Insider.

"Mr. Arrington is not being paid by TechCrunch, he does not report to TechCrunch editors, and he does not report to Arianna Huffington or other AOL Huffington Post Media Group personnel, Ms. Huffington adds in an email to Business Insider," the blog reported.

Read More →

The Wall Street Journal reports:



The crowd of Democrats lining up to run against Sen. Scott Brown in Massachusetts got a little thinner Friday, when Rep. Michael Capuano announced he would not run for Senate in 2012.

The Wall Street Journal reports:



The crowd of Democrats lining up to run against Sen. Scott Brown in Massachusetts got a little thinner Friday, when Rep. Michael Capuano announced he would not run for Senate in 2012.

The Wall Street Journal reports:



The crowd of Democrats lining up to run against Sen. Scott Brown in Massachusetts got a little thinner Friday, when Rep. Michael Capuano announced he would not run for Senate in 2012.

New Hampshire Republican Party Chair Jack Kimball, who won his post in the key presidential primary state earlier this year with the help of Tea Party activists, resigned the same office Thursday night at a meeting of the state party executive board -- following pressure for him to step down due to problems with fundraising and personnel, and just before the board was expected to officially vote him out.

The Concord Monitor reports:

"Don't do it, Jack!" yelled a supporter as Kimball made his announcement last night inside a Holiday Inn conference room in Concord, where onlookers gathered around a long table seating the 36-member executive committee.

"I have come to the conclusion that even if, during a vote, if I were to win - and I know the odds are against that - it would be next to impossible for me to fulfill my obligations as chairman moving forward given what's been against me," Kimball said. After speaking for four minutes from the head of the table, he received a standing ovation from the executive committee and those in attendance.

Read More →

As Democrats prepare to use House Majority Leader Eric Cantor's words about disaster relief funding against the whole GOP, the progressives at MoveOn.org are helping to get the ball rolling with a new national television ad calling Cantor's call for spending cuts to pay for disaster aid "appalling."

"Republicans like Eric Cantor are threatening to hold victims of Hurricane Irene hostage by demanding budget cuts in exchange for aid," the ad's narrator says. "Abandoning families who have lost everything just to serve the GOP's extreme agenda? It's heartless, appalling and it's not how we do things in America."

Read More →

It's clear to Mitt Romney what Americans should do about the terrible August job numbers released Friday.

"In order to change the direction of this country, we need to change presidents," Romney said in a statement Friday. President Obama "has failed," he said, and it's time for the country to move on from hope and change.

But it's also clear to Romney what Republican primary voters should do in the wake of the ugly jobs report: go against what appears to be their nature and pick someone other than Rick Perry to be their presidential nominee next year.

Read More →

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor's requirement that new disaster relief spending be funded with spending cuts has left members of his party open to attack, Democrats say, and they don't plan to waste the opportunity.

This week, the DCCC called on 25 East Coast Republican members to either stand with Cantor's call for offset disaster spending or publicly oppose it. In areas still drying out from Hurricane Irene and repairing the damage from the East Coast earthquake that preceded it, Democrats think the suggestion that federal aid should be used as another budget cut bargaining chip will not sit well with voters.

Read More →

Billing himself as the candidate of the "real world" and highlighting his breaks from party orthodoxy, Jon Huntsman has tried to brand himself as a pragmatic truth-teller in a GOP that has swung too far towards the hardline right.

But his rhetoric and policy hasn't always matched up with the broader message in recent days. The tension is most evident in his grand jobs plan, the centerpiece of which is a proposal to slash taxes for the wealthy while eliminating a plethora of popular breaks for homeowners and middle class Americans. Huntsman sells the move on its purity -- tax expenditures for corporations and average Americans alike would be dropped to lower rates -- but realistically, the plan has virtually no chance of passing Congressional muster. The Bowles-Simpson deficit commission, hardly a darling of the left, acknowledged as much in their report last year, suggesting lawmakers keep some of the most popular breaks -- like the mortgage interest deductions, exemptions for employer-provided health care, and the earned income tax credit -- in order to generate sufficient support for tax reform along the lines Huntsman proposes.

Read More →

LiveWire