TPM News

Here are the line-ups for the Sunday talk shows this weekend:

• ABC, This Week: Sec. of State Hillary Clinton.

• CBS, Face The Nation: David Axelrod, Senior White House Adviser; Former Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-GA).

• CNN, State Of The Union: David Axelrod, Senior White House Adviser.

• Fox News Sunday: Austan Goolsbee, member of the White House Council of Economic Advisers; Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL); Google CEO Eric Schmidt; and Fred Malek, chairman of Thayer Lodging Group and Thayer Capital Partners.

• Meet The Press will not air this weekend, due to NBC's coverage of the French Open.

Liz Cheney's basic line about President Obama's historic speech yesterday is that she's "troubled" that Obama thinks he can stop terrorism with "hand-holding."

Pretty harsh, right? Well, she's got nothing, though, on Sen. James Inhofe (R-OK). He called the speech, "un-American," adding, "I just don't know whose side he's on."

Curious which 'sides' Inhofe might have had in mind, I asked his communications director, Jared Young, to complete the picture a bit. According to Young, Inhofe was saying he's "kind of confused about why the President's going on foreign soil and in some cases echoing talking points from al Qaeda about Guantanamo Bay."

So is he saying he think's the President's on the side of terrorists?

"No, no, he's not saying that, no. He just certainly doesn't seem to be on the side of our men and women in uniform."

Well, I guess that clears that up.

As part of a cover package called "The Wise Latina," the folks over at the conservative National Review--apparently flummoxed by the very idea of a "wise Latina"--have caricaturized the Puerto Rican-descended Sonia Sotomayor as an Asian Buddhist.

Good times.

Also featured on the cover in the current issue: "Jonah Goldberg On His Critics." That better be a long article.

A new Daily Kos/Research 2000 poll suggests that two key right-wing talking points against Sonia Sotomayor, which they've worked hard to get into the collective public mind, have in fact...totally failed.

"Based on what you know or have heard about Sonia Sotomayor do you think she is a racist?" The numbers: Yes 8%, No 61%. Even among Republicans, the number is only Yes 19%, No 28%.

"Do you think empathy is an important characteristic for a Supreme Court Justice to possess or not?" The numbers: Yes 52%, No 29%.

Newt Gingrich spoke last night to the Connecticut Republican Party, and made it clear just how much he trusts Dick Cheney over President Obama.

"One was chief of staff, secretary of defense and a vice president who concentrated on national security," Gingrich said to the assembled Republicans. "The other read a couple of left-wing books on the CIA."

It's an interesting description of the current President of the United States, who was also previously a U.S. Senator -- making him sound like the lefty kids you see on college campuses, carrying around copies of Noam Chomsky.

Interestingly, there was a dog that didn't bark: Gingrich didn't mention Sonia Sotomayor, against whom he's kind of, sort of, not really backed away from calling a racist.

Now this is some chutzpah....

You might remember that a few years ago, Washington's Republicans were all up in arms over the fact that classified information about the Bush administration's warrantless wiretapping program had been leaked to the New York Times. The Justice Department began an investigation into the leak, and congressional GOPers gravely declared what a serious crime this was.

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Former Sen. Norm Coleman (R-MN) spoke to a friendly conservative video-blogger yesterday at the at the Conservative Heartland Leadership Conference in St. Louis, and said Republicans need to more effectively organize around the newer modes of communication -- like the "ethernet":



"In the end, we need to compete, as I've said before, we need to compete in each and every kind of forum," said Coleman. "And whether it's on the ground traditionally, or today it's in -- it's in the ethernet. It's in the -- you know, it's online. It's in the blogs, it's Twitter, it's Facebook, and the next iteration."

Oh well. At least he's trying.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), who is moving to further lock up support among the Democratic base and solidify her momentum against any potential primary challengers, has just announced the endorsements of Rev. Al Sharpton and Rep. Gregory Meeks.

In the campaign's press release, Sharpton said that Gillibrand is committed to working on issues facing minority communities, and to working with President Obama -- the man who has also made one known phone call to clear the field for her.

"I was impressed that the day after being selected to replace Hillary Clinton in the Senate, she came down to the House of Justice in Harlem to hear the real concerns of the voiceless," Sharpton said. "I am proud to endorse her today because I believe she will be a strong, passionate advocate for children and families. I believe she is committed to working with President Barack Obama to create jobs and improve education for minorities in New York City and across the state."

Republicans tend to object whenever Democrats insist on calling the GOP "the party of 'no'," but then someone like Sen. James Inhofe (R-OK) will go and say something like this and suddenly we're reminded that their grounds for objection are pretty thin.

The EPA has threatened to regulate this through the Clean Air Act. That isn't going to work in my opinion because we can stall that until we get a new president--that shouldn't be a problem. ... But while the House will pass a bill ... in the Senate, they're not going to be able to pass it.


Inhofe was speaking at the Heartland Institute's Third International Conference on Climate Change, where he was a welcomed guest. In that comfortable environment, he let loose a little. "As I've told Barbara Boxer, 'Get over it. Get a Life. You've lost. We've won," Inhofe said to laughter and applause.

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Speaking to reporters yesterday at the Conservative Heartland Leadership Conference in St. Louis, Norm Coleman did not rule out a run for Governor of Minnesota in 2010, now that incumbent Republican Tim Pawlenty has announced he isn't running again. But he also seemed to leave the door open to further litigation over his former Senate seat, in the wake of reports that he was ready to throw in the towel after the state Supreme Court presumably rules against him.

"I'm still waiting to hear from the Supreme Court," said Coleman, when asked about a gubernatorial run. "Remember I just gave a speech about being focused? I'm a very focused guy, and the focus is on keeping my Senate seat."

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