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President Obama brought down the house last night at the White House Correspondents Association's annual dinner in Washington Saturday night. Obama mocked the birther movement -- showing a clip from what he said was his "birth video" and took shots at Donald Trump and other potential Republican presidential candidates.

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Obama: 'Instead Of Subsidizing Yesterday's Energy, We Should Invest In Tomorrow's' In this weekend's YouTube address, President Obama reiterated his call for an end to subsidies for the oil and gas industries:

"Understand, I'm not opposed to producing oil," said Obama. "I believe that if we're serious about meeting our energy challenge, we need to operate on all cylinders, and that means pursuing a broad range of energy policies, including safe and responsible oil production here at home. In fact, last year, America's oil production reached its highest level since 2003. "But I also believe that instead of subsidizing yesterday's energy, we should invest in tomorrow's - and that's what we've been doing. Already, we've seen how the investments we're making in clean energy can lead to new jobs and new businesses. I've seen some of them myself - small businesses that are making the most of solar and wind power, and energy-efficient technologies; big companies that are making fuel-efficient cars and trucks part of their vehicle fleets. And to promote these kinds of vehicles, we implemented historic new fuel-economy standards, which could save you as much as $3,000 at the pump."

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In New Hampshire Friday, Mitt Romney stumbled over a line about pinning the nation's melancholy on President Obama that found him scrambling to back away from a quote suggesting Republicans are going to "hang" Obama with America's problems in 2012.

"Uh, so to speak -- metaphorically," Romney quickly corrected, before adding, "you have to be careful these days, I've learned that."

It was a standout gaffe from the first major candidate forum of the 2012 cycle in the Granite State, where Romney joined four other presidential hopefuls at an event sponsored by the tea party-fueling Americans For Prosperity group.

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The first major New Hampshire candidate forum of the 2012 cycle just wrapped up and, not surprisingly, Mitt Romney -- the man leading the polls in the state that will host the first primary next year -- was asked a direct question about the health care law he signed while governor of Massachusetts.

The forum was sponsored by Americans For Prosperity, the Koch brothers-funded group that helped tens of thousands pack DC to protest the health care law signed by President Obama last year, which was modeled in part on the plan Romney put into law when he was a chief executive.

Given the audience -- and Republican disdain for the health care law in general -- it was perhaps unsurprising that Romney declined to give a direct answer to the question about his law.

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The White House imposed new sanctions on Syria Friday and called on other U.S. allies to follow suit.

President Obama announced the sanctions through a White House executive order in response to a violent crackdown on protesters airing grievances with the government of Bashar Al-Assad, whose family has ruled Syria for four decades.

Syrian citizens Friday crowded the streets in more than 30 cities and towns across the country for its latest "day of rage" protests, promptly a deadly blow from Al-Assad's military, which killed nearly 30 people, according to a Syrian human rights group.

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Republican Governor Mitch Daniels released a statement Friday afternoon saying he will sign legislation stripping federal funds from Planned Parenthood in Indiana, the first state to make such a move.

The statement reads:

"I will sign HEA 1210 when it reaches my desk a week or so from now. I supported this bill from the outset, and the recent addition of language guarding against the spending of tax dollars to support abortions creates no reason to alter my position. The principle involved commands the support of an overwhelming majority of Hoosiers, as reflected in greater than 2:1 bipartisan votes in both legislative chambers.


"I commissioned a careful review of access to services across the state and can confirm that all non-abortion services, whether family planning or basic women's health, will remain readily available in every one of our 92 counties. In addition, I have ordered the Family and Social Services Administration to see that Medicaid recipients receive prompt notice of nearby care options. We will take any actions necessary to ensure that vital medical care is, if anything, more widely available than before.

"Any organization affected by this provision can resume receiving taxpayer dollars immediately by ceasing or separating its operations that perform abortions."


Once he signs the bill, it will go into effect immediately, and would bar Planned Parenthood from receiving any public dollars -- including Medicaid payments, which are crucial to the group's patient population.

"We do around 500 pap tests a week," Indiana Planned Parenthood President Betty Cockrum told TPM in an interview earlier on Friday. "We will be making phone calls to Medicaid patients all over the state and telling them, either you have to pay for that pap test out of pocket, or you need to find someone else who can take you as a Medicaid patient. We can't do it anymore."

There are 28 Planned Parenthood centers in the state. Almost 60 percent of patients seen last year were living under the poverty line.

The announcement was met shock by Planned Parenthood in Indiana, who had earlier expressed confidence that Daniels would weigh the bill's consequences carefully before signing.

"The signing of HB 1210 into law is unconscionable and unspeakable. We will now suffer the consequences of lawmakers who have no regard for fact-based decision making and sound public health policy," said Cockrum in a statement.

"As many as 22,000 low-income Hoosiers will lose their medical home. Countless patients will find themselves without access to lifesaving tests to avoid the tragic outcomes of cervical and breast cancer and epidemic sexually transmitted disease here in Indiana."

She said Planned Parenthood would be filing an injunction immediately to try to halt "this alarming erosion of public health policy" in Indiana.

Nancy Keenan, president of NARAL Pro-Choice America, also issued a statement in response to the news.
"Gov. Mitch Daniels has put his presidential ambitions above thousands of Hoosier women, who, as a result of his actions, will lose access to birth control, cancer screenings, and other basic health care. Daniels now will distinguish himself as a governor who defunded Planned Parenthood. He will also open the door to further political interference in women's personal, private decisions. With the stroke of a pen, Daniels will declare his truce on social issues to be over."

That didn't take long.

Just hours after the launch Friday of two new Democratic Super Pacs designed to keep President Obama in the White House and counter deep-pocketed GOP groups who helped Republicans win control of the House in 2010, a prominent watchdog group announced plans to file a complaint against them with the IRS.

The two new groups, Priorities USA and Priorities USA Action, were formed by former Obama White House aides Bill Burton and Sean Sweeney to take advantage of the Supreme Court's Citizens United ruling last year and will collect unlimited funds -- with the goal of $100 million -- from corporations and unions. Only one of the two groups will disclose their donors to the Federal Election Commission.

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1||The royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton went off without a hitch Friday, April 29, with legions of well-wishers watching the ceremony. Middleton wore an ivory-colored dress designed by Sarah Burton. More than 8,000 journalists reportedly descended on the scene to eventually watch William and Kate share two kisses on the Buckingham Palace balcony. Middleton is the first "commoner" to marry a prince in more than 350 years.

Here are more pictures from Friday's royal wedding.||newscom/Zeng Yi Xinhua News Agency&&

2||Kate and William -- now the Duchess and Duke of Cambridge -- in a horse-drawn carriage on their way to Buckingham Palace after the wedding ceremony at Westminister Abbey.||newscom/LUETTRINGHAUS/BABIRAD/SIPA&&

3||William and Kate with her father, Michael Middleton, at Westminster Abbey.||newscom/ZUMA Press&&

4||The crowd on Buckingham Palace's mall.||newscom/OLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images&&

5||Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip.||newscom/NIEBOER/PICTURE PRESS EUROPE/SIP&&

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7||Prince Charles arrives for the wedding.||newscom/KEVIN DIETSCH/UPI&&

8||Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip leave Westminster Abbey following the ceremony.||newscom/Guibbaud-Mousse-Nebinger-Orban/ABACA&&

9||Chef Fiona Cairns and her team made the cake for the royal wedding.||newscom/JOHN STILLWELL/AFP/Getty Images&&

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11||Prince Harry.||newscom/NIEBOER/PICTURE PRESS EUROPE/SIP/&&

12||British Prime Minister David Cameron.||newscom/Boris Roessler/dpa/picture-alliance&&

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14||Kate Middleton arrives at Westminster Abbey for her wedding.||newscom/Splash News&&

15||Members of the royal family take their places for the ceremony.||newscom/ZUMA Press&&

16||Princes William and Harry.||newscom/Splash News/WUF&&

17||Prince Charles and The Duchess of Cornwall arrive for the ceremony.||newscom/ZUMA Press&&

18||British film director Guy Ritchie and his girlfriend Jacqui Ainsley.||newscom/KIRSTY WIGGLESWORTH/AFP/Getty Images&&

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21||Soccer star David Beckham and his wife Victoria.||newscom/KIRSTY WIGGLESWORTH/AFP/Getty Images&&

22||A crowd in Hyde Park, London, watch the newlyweds kiss.||newscom/ZUMA Press&&

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28||Kate Middleton, center, walks down the aisle, accompanied by her father.||newscom/ANDREW MILLIGAN/AFP/Getty Images&&

29||||newscom/GEOFF CADDICK/AFP/Getty Images&&

30||||newscom/WENN Photos&&

31||Duchess Camilla leaves Westminster Abbey with Carole Middleton, left, after the ceremony.||newscom/Boris Roessler/dpa/picture-alliance&&

32||Royal supporters gather in Hyde Park in London.||newscom/CARL COURT/AFP/Getty Images&&

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36||Reverend Richard Chartres, Lord Bishop of London, reads from the pulpit while William and Kate look on.||newscom/Photoshot/AdMedia&&

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38||The wedding procession travels toward Buckingham Palace after the wedding ceremony.||newscom/ZUMA Press&&

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41||William and Kate ride into Whitehall after the ceremony.||newscom/North Downs Picture Agency Mirrorpix&&

42||||newscom/Steve nicholson/Daily Mirror&&

43||Police officers stand along the wedding processional route.||newscom/PIERRE-PHILIPPE MARCOU/AFP/Getty Images&&

44||||newscom/ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images&&

45||||newscom/Kurt Kreiger/Allstar/Sportsphoto Ltd./Allstar&&

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47||||newscom/Anthony Devlin/Photoshot/AdMedia&&

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50||William and Kate leave Buckingham Palace in an Aston Martin for the short drive to Clarence House.||newscom/Mike Moore/Mirrorpix&&

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