TPM News

Will the liberal media not have Sarah Palin to kick around anymore? In an interview Wednesday night on Greta Van Susteren's TV show, Palin declared she's "through whining about a liberal press," and that she has "made my point."

Van Susteren and Palin discussed Rep. Michele Bachmann's (R-MN), response to her gaffe about placing the crucial Revolutionary War towns of Lexington and Concord in New Hampshire, when they are in fact in Massachusetts. Bachmann has argued that the media plays up the gaffes of conservative women such as herself while ignoring similar slips from liberal politicians.

"Yes, of course women are held to a different standard in all areas," said Palin. "But my point is gonna be -- so what? You know, let's just work harder, produce more, produce better, and get over it. You know, I am through whining about a liberal press that holds, especially conservative women, to a different standard. Because it doesn't do me any good to whine about it. I made my point."

Of course, considering how much of Palin's public discourse involves attacking the "lame-stream media" and its perpetration of "blood libel" against her, will she have much left to talk about?"

Read More →

For the first time since the Justice Department relaxed the requirements in December on when federal law enforcement have to inform terrorism suspects of their Miranda rights, a reporter has seen a copy of the guidance issued by Attorney General Eric Holder and reports it gives FBI agents more latitude and flexibility in delaying informing suspects of their right to remain silent.

Read More →

The Republican presidential field could be on the verge of having two Minnesotans -- and one of them a national Tea Party movement star, with Rep. Michele Bachmann reportedly set to establish a presidential exploratory committee in June.

As CNN reports, a source close to Bachmann says it could potentially happen even earlier:

"She's been telling everyone early summer," the source told CNN regarding Bachmann's planned June filing and announcement. But the source said that nothing is static.

"If you [debate sponsors] come to us and say, 'To be in our debates, you have to have an exploratory committee,' then we'll say, 'Okay, fine...I'll go file the forms.'"


Bachmann's fellow Minnesotan, former Gov. Tim Pawlenty, established his own exploratory committee earlier this week. What Bachmann can bring to the table is an ability to excite enthusiasm with the Tea Party base -- and also some interesting expertise with alternative American history.

Read More →

Stephen Colbert isn't convinced that Japan's nuclear crisis should derail the construction of new nuclear plants in America.

Last night, Colbert noted that white smoke is still pouring from a quake-damaged nuclear reactor in Japan.

"It either means the reactor has gone critical, or they've elected a new Pope," Colbert said.

Read More →

The contretemps between Fox News and CNN over their Libya coverage continues to unfold. This time, Fox's veteran national security reporter, who unwittingly touched off the dispute, weighs in to call CNN's conduct "unprofessional," "nonsense," and beneath them. She also joked, "CNN has put a landmine out there so I can stop reporting."

"My reporting was not meant to point fingers; it was to get the facts out there," Jennifer Griffin told Mediabistro. "It was not about attacking anyone personally. I feel, unfortunately, CNN decided to make this personal, by saying what I think are extremely unprofessional things about my colleague Steve Harrigan who is a fabulous reporter and who is a great war correspondent and I think what they said about him was indefensible. They made this personal. I did not."

Read More →

1||Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour hasn't formally declared he's running for president. But he has made a number of high-profile hires, including former Mitt Romney adviser Sally Bradshaw, and is floating an anti-Afghan War platform as of late.

March 5, 1996: Barbour addresses an event honoring Dewitt L. Fortenberry as the 200th person to switch to the Republican Party after President Bill Clinton took office. ||newscom/Ken Cedeno&&

2||January 29, 1993: Barbour after being elected chairman of the Republican National Committee||C-SPAN&&

3||February 22, 1993: Barbour discusses Clinton's first month as president.||C-SPAN&&

4||Barbour in 2005 surveys Hurricane Katrina damage in Gulfport, Miss. ||newscom/Suzi Altman/ZUMA Press&&

5||Sept. 2, 2005: President George W. Bush in Biloxi, Miss., with Mayor A.J. Holloway, left, Sen. Thad Cochran (R-MS) and Barbour.||newscom/Tim Isbell/KRT&&

6||Nov. 1, 2003: President Bush stumps for Barbour as a gubernatorial candidate in Washington, Miss.||newscom/w85/ZUMA Press&&

7||January 9, 1988: Barbour at the closing session of the Southern Republican Exchange.||C-SPAN&&

8||Barbour in 2005 testifies in Washington before a bipartisan committee investigating the preparedness for and response to Hurricane Katrina.||newscom/Tom Williams/Roll Call Photos&&

9||June 23, 2009: Then-House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-OH), Barbour and Rep. Mike Pence (R-IN) before a news conference in Washington discussing health care reform.||newscom/Bill Clark/Roll Call Photos&&

10||February 23, 2009: Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner and Barbour before President Barack Obama addresses the National Governors Association in the White House's State Dining Room.||newscom/Dennis Brack/CNP&&

11||June 14, 2010: Obama joins a roundtable discussion at Combs Pier in Gulfport, Miss., to assess the BP oil spill's damage to the Gulf of Mexico. Adm. Thad Allen, Barbour, Gulfport Mayor George Schloegel and local business owners were among those in attendance.||newscom/z03/ZUMA Press&&

12||June 2, 2010: Haley and Marsha Barbour examine a tarball found on the beach at Petit Pois Island off the Mississippi coast.||newscom/Drew Tarter/MCT&&

13||||newscom/Tim Isbell/MCT&&

14||Barbour in 2006 in Seattle at the 96th annual National Governors Association meeting.||newscom/Daren Fentiman/ZUMA Press&&

15||November 4, 2003: Barbour thanks a friend after voting in Yazoo City, Miss.||newscom/w85/ZUMA Press&&

16||Nov. 4, 2003: Barbour and his wife, Marsha, celebrate his election as governor of Mississippi.||newscom/w85/ZUMA Press&&

17||||newscom/w85/ZUMA Press&&

18||March 18, 2005: Barbour in Jackson, Miss., during a St. Patrick's Day parade.||newscom/a17/ZUMA Press&&

19||Barbour in 2006 testifies in Washington on "Hurricane Katrina: The Role of the Governors in Managing the Catastrophe."||newscom/Tom Williams/Roll Call Photos&&

In his first public comments addressing Project Gunrunner -- a national initiative by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) to combat illegal gun trafficking along the Mexico border now taking heat for allegedly letting guns end up in the hands of criminals -- President Barack Obama conceded that "a serious mistake" may have been made.

During an interview with a reporter from Univision that aired Tuesday night, Obama said he was "absolutely not" informed about the ATF program. The agency came under fire after a senior ATF agent told media outlets that supervisors ordered agents not to intercept weapons made in suspicious sales -- but instead to monitor them to see where the weapons ended up.

Read More →

Jon Stewart waded into the spat between Fox News and CNN last night, knocking both organizations for continuing to report on their own feud rather than the ongoing strife in Libya.

Earlier this week, Fox said they did not send a correspondent stationed in Libya on a government-led tour for fear that he would be used as a human shield.

"Kudos to Fox for so quickly putting the crisis into service of their real mission, patriotic self-promotion," Stewart said.

Read More →

By not defining a clear mission in Libya and failing to offer up a distinct exit strategy, President Obama is making the military very nervous. At least that's how former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld sees it.

Rumsfeld told Politico that the mission in Libya is "confused" by the way the coalition of nations currently enforcing the no-fly zone was put together. And that's not what servicemen and women going to battle in the Middle East want, Rumsfeld says.

"If peoples' lives are at risk and you're using military forces, you need to have a rather clear understanding as to who's in charge and who's making the decisions," he said.

Read More →

LiveWire