TPM News

It's one thing for a national cable network to feature a Nazi sympathizer as a political analyst, and refuse to answer questions about it. It's another for that network to actively promote that person's apologies for Hitler.

But that's what MSNBC is doing.

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Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley has just announced her candidacy for the Democratic nomination for the late Ted Kennedy's Senate seat, becoming the first candidate to officially announce a campaign.

Coakley paid tribute to the late Kennedy. "As some have noted, no one can fill his shoes, but we must try to follow in his footsteps," said Coakley. "I think we all realize that the urgency of this time is clear, and it is that urgency that drives my decision. Today, I announce my candidate for the United States Senate."

It's interesting that Coakley has not waited for word from other potential candidates -- especially former Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy, a son of Robert Kennedy and nephew of Ted Kennedy, who has been much speculated about as a possible player. Somebody had to get in first, and Coakley is it.

Rep. Paul Broun (R-GA) is reiterating his dire warnings about President Obama imposing an authoritarian regime in the United States, the Athens Banner-Herald reports.

At a meeting of local Republicans last night, Broun said that Obama already has or will have the three key elements necessary to become a dictator: A national police force, gun control and control of the press.

"He has the three things that are necessary to establish an authoritarian government," Broun said. "And so we need to be ever-vigilant, because freedom is precious."

House Progressives are increasingly indicating that they're worried the White House will sacrifice the public option.

"Many Members of Congress -- including myself -- will not support a health insurance reform bill that does not break the strangle hold of private insurance companies on our health care system," said Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-IL). "That requires that consumers have a choice of a robust public health insurance plan. I will support nothing short of a robust public health insurance plan upon implementation, no triggers. I believe Congress will pass and the President will sign such a bill this Fall."

Schakowsky is chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus' health care task force. She's also a close Obama ally and many progressives believe that if the White House wants House progressives to compromise further on the public option, it will turn to her first. For now she's saying she's not budging.

Last night, Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-AZ), co-chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus sent out a telling press release.

"I have grave concerns about calls reportedly being made from the Administration to health care reform advocacy organizations supporting the choice of a public option insurance plan," Grijalva said.

Grijalva said the White House is telling health care reformers, "they will cease supporting the public option portion of the upcoming health care reform legislation"

I truly expect the President to live up to the promises he has made to America about real change and that he truly stands for uninsured Americans and working families that need and are demanding a choice of a competitive public option when he addresses Wednesday's joint session of Congress.

Without a public option, this bill is not real reform. Real reform would lower and contain health care costs, precisely what inclusion of a public option would achieve. Without a robust public option, reform will enrich pharmaceutical and insurance companies because it will lack any significant competition and incentives to drive down health care costs for consumers.


Over 60 House progressives have vowed not to vote for legislation that doesn't include a public option--enough to ensure that a bill won't pass if they follow through.

Kennedy Memoir Does Not Ignore Personal Lows The New York Times reports that Ted Kennedy's upcoming memoir, True Compass, does not gloss over his personal flaws -- notably calling his behavior after his 1969 car accident, which killed Mary Jo Kopechne, "inexcusable." Kennedy also wrote: "I have enjoyed the company of women. I have enjoyed a stiff drink or two or three, and I've relished the smooth taste of a good wine. At times, I've enjoyed these pleasures too much. I've heard the tales about my exploits as a hell-raiser -- some accurate, some with a wisp of truth to them and some so outrageous that I can't imagine how anyone could really believe them."

Biden's Day Ahead Vice President Biden will deliver a speech at 10 a.m. ET today from the Brookings Institution, on progress that has been made under the stimulus bill. He will spend the remainder of the day in private meetings at the White House.

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A KTLA report from a health care rally near Los Angeles last night may not include gun-toting protesters, but it does describe another sort of weapon: teeth. As in, a pro-reform protester used his teeth to bite off the finger of an anti-reformer.

According to KTLA, a group of anti-health care reform protesters set up across the street from about 100 pro-reform demonstrators at a MoveOn.org-sponsored rally. Apparently, a pro-reformer walking through the anti-reform group to join the rest of his gang got into an altercation with a 65-year-old man who was on the anti-health care team.

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I asked Florida state GOP press secretary Katie Gordon for comment from chairman Jim Greer about the latest developments regarding President Obama's upcoming speech to schoolchildren -- namely the decision of the Department of Education to revise a section of its materials about how children could "help the president," to remove that phrase.

Gordon e-mailed me back: "He [Greer] is still concerned about what the President will say, but the White House revisions shows that President Obama now knows that parents across this country will be watching and listening carefully to his speech to our children."

The materials now more clearly ask students "how they can achieve their short‐term and long‐term education goals," which was what the students were supposed to help Obama with before. The new version is now free of any potential political context from that section.

After suggesting that the public option had passed on into the realm of the spirits, White House adviser David Axelrod now says Obama still embraces the measure, but will not say whether he'll stand behind it when he addresses Congress on Wednesday.

"The President embraced the public option because he believes" it would be a boon to consumers, Axelrod told CNN's Ed Henry.

However, he would not say one way or another whether that means Obama will rally for it when he addresses a joint session of Congress next week. "I'm not going to deal with the details of the President's speech," Axelrod said. "Otherwise there wouldn't be any point in giving it."

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