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Organizing for America officials offered a look at some of their metrics they say has helped the fledgling group be successful. Read TPMDC's story here and here's a transcript of the interview with directory Mitch Stewart and deputy director Jeremy Bird.

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This is a partial transcript of TPMDC's Monday interview with Mitch Stewart, director of Organizing for America, and Jeremy Bird, OFA deputy director. Read the story here.

Christina Bellantoni: One year after the big win, how do you guys feel about things?

Jeremy Bird: Good. This weekend was a big deal for us. It was kind of nice during the same week to have the campaign celebration, watch the documentary, relive some of the campaign and then clear the first big hurdle in health reform.

It feels good about where the country is. We always said the campaign was a chance to get to the point where we can make change and a year later having that same kind of feeling that we had on election day on Saturday was good. Organizationally we feel really really good. ... We're only nine months in and we have been methodically building across the country since January.

We're up to 49 states states where we have staff.

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Nine months ago when the Democrats who ran Barack's Obama campaign created Organizing for America, no one was sure exactly how it would work or whether it was possible to harness the enthusiasm for the new president and translate it into action.

But nearing the anniversary of Obama's election, OFA has strengthened into a (smaller) mirror of the campaign, with volunteers in every single Congressional district and staff on the ground in every state but Oklahoma.

They also are growing the Obama donor base.

TPMDC has learned that 24.7 percent of the donations made online to OFA are new donors - people who didn't give during the campaign. That's a pretty striking figure give that a record 3 million people donated during 2007 and 2008.

Organizationally, the boots-on-the-ground, Washington outsider vibe has translated into real results as well. Saturday morning, an OFA volunteer in Louisiana flagged for the team that Rep. Joseph Cao (R-LA) might end up supporting health care.

The administration had been talking to Cao behind the scenes, but it was the volunteer who emailed OFA staffers to report that the Republican's office wasn't saying he was against the bill which opened the floodgates. OFA volunteers made 550 calls to the district office on Saturday in the hours before he became the lone Republican to back the bill.

In an exclusive interview with TPMDC, OFA officials laid out their metrics so far and stressed the results have exceeded expectations.

It was no surprise that Mitch Stewart, OFA's director, and Jeremy Bird, the deputy director, remained on message at all times. They told me nearly a dozen times the OFA mission is to support the president's agenda, and downplayed any disappointment that Obama voters couldn't make the difference in last week's state races in Virginia and New Jersey.

But the wide-ranging interview did lift the curtain on the organization, officially deemed a special project of the Democratic National Committee.

As I detailed earlier this year, OFA and the DNC share a building and merged finances, but keep many things separate. Among those are the list of email supporters, which stood at 13 million at the end of the long campaign. (They won't disclose its size today.)

Campaign geeks may like the transcript of our interview, and come along after the jump to delve into how OFA is doing.

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Sarah Palin's public pronouncements have now reached an amazing point -- where even Fox News is fact-checking her.

As Fox News anchor Bret Baier noted this evening, picking up on a Politico report, Palin said this past Friday that there had been a lot of "change" of late, and talked about the dollar coin -- how the phrase "In God We Trust" had been moved to the rim of the coin, rather than on the face. "Who makes a decision like that?" said Palin, seemingly pointing to the Obama administration, adding: "It's a disturbing trend."

However, the coins were in fact commissioned in 2005 by the Republican-led government of the time. And as Baier adds, Congress acted specifically to change this in 2007, and Fox displayed a James K. Polk presidential coin with the phrase on the coin's face.

U.N. General Secretary Ban Ki-Moon stopped by the Capitol today to lobby Senators to get on board with comprehensive climate change legislation in advance of next month's U.N. climate summit in Copenhagen.

The response he got from Senators mired in the debate over health care reform? Get in line, pal.

Sen. John Kerry (D-MA), Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-CT) and Sen. Richard Lugar (R-IN) joined Moon with reporters after his closed-door meeting with the Senators. All three said that there was no chance a climate change bill will make it out of the Senate by Copenhagen, and slim chance it will come after that. Kerry said the bill comes after health care and financial services reform in terms of Senate priority.

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Looking ahead to the 2010 Senate races, when Democrats hope to expand their 60-seat supermajority and Republicans want to chip away at it, there are a whole bunch of competitive races on each side -- and with no immediately obvious sure bets for which seats might flip, a whole lot could happen.

In theory, the Democrats could expand their ranks even further, after two consecutive wave elections, for the reason that only one-third of the Senate is up at a given time. Thus, the Senators who are up in 2010 were shielded from the 2006 and 2008 Democratic waves, in which the Dems won nearly all the Senate races they could possibly take. To sweeten the deal for Democrats, more Republican-held seats are up in total than Democratic ones -- because 2004, when this Senate class was last up for election, was a Republican year.

A lot will depend on the national environment. In marginal cases, whether it's a Democratic or Republican year, and the extent of this, can make the difference for the candidates involved, and likely made the difference in some of those close races in 2004, 2006 and 2008.

Let's take a look at some of the top races.

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We don't know if this is reason for hope, or just low comedy. But the right-wing think tank that published conservative author Dave Gaubatz's call for a backlash against the "Muslim community" has now scrubbed the line and replaced it with a call for a backlash against the "Muslim Brotherhood."

Here's how the passage of the Fort Hood Q&A with Gaubatz, the author of Muslim Mafia, read on Monday (see a screengrab of the original here):

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November 10: A memorial service is held in Fort Hood, Texas, to commemorate those killed in the November 5 shootings that claimed 13 lives and wounded 29. President Obama attends the service with his family, and in his remarks says of the fallen: "Their memory will be honored in the places they lived and by the people they touched. Their life's work is our security, and the freedom that we too often take for granted. Every evening that the sun sets on a tranquil town; every dawn that a flag is unfurled; every moment that an American enjoys life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness -- that is their legacy."

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Soldiers await the start of the memorial service.

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Heather Baker, left, whose husband is in Iraq, gets a hug from Sergeant 1st Class Kelley Macek at the memorial service.

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Newscom/Tannen Maury / Pool/ Sipa Press




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Soldiers wounded during the shooting arrive for the memorial.

Newscom/Tannen Maury / Pool/ Sipa Press







Defense Secretary Robert Gates arrives at the service.

Newscom/Tannen Maury / Pool/ Sipa Press




President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive at the memorial.

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The President and First Lady observe a moment of silence.

Newscom/Tannen Maury / Pool/ Sipa Press




Soldiers stand at attention during the national anthem.

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The First Cavalry Division Band plays at the memorial.




Lt. Gen. Robert Cone speaks at the memorial.




Gen. George Casey, Army Chief of Staff, also speaks at the memorial.




Obama takes the stage to make his remarks.

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Soldiers fold a large American flag used as the backdrop during the service.

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The President and First Lady pass pictures of the fallen as they leave after the ceremony.

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Newscom/Courtney Perry/Dallas Morning News/MCT

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