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Shahira Amin was a deputy head and a senior correspondent for Nile TV -- a government-owned channel -- until yesterday that is, when she quit her job in protest over claims that she was directed to deliver propaganda from the Egyptian government. Amin reportedly said on the air, "I refuse to be a hypocrite. I feel liberated."

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Apple is exerting more control over content purchased for and available on its popular iPad by enforcing rules that require magazine, newspaper and e-reader publishers to sell all content through iTunes.

As of March 31, apps that do not take payments through its iTunes store will be rejected. Although Apple has long required app publishers to sell subscriptions via Apple's "In App Purchase API," some publishers -- notably, The Wall Street Journal andThe Financial Times -- sold them outside Apple's digital store.

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Apple is exerting more control over content purchased for and available on its popular iPad by enforcing rules that require magazine, newspaper and e-reader publishers to sell all content through iTunes.

As of March 31, apps that do not take payments through its iTunes store will be rejected. Although Apple has long required app publishers to sell subscriptions via Apple's "In App Purchase API," some publishers -- notably, The Wall Street Journal andThe Financial Times -- sold them outside Apple's digital store.

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by Paul Kiel and Olga Pierce ProPublica Feb. 4, 2011, 8:48 a.m.

Before he took office, President Obama repeatedly promised voters and Democrats in Congress that he'd fight for changes to bankruptcy laws to help homeowners--a tough approach that would force banks to modify mortgages.

"I will change our bankruptcy laws to make it easier for families to stay in their homes," Obama told supporters at a Colorado rally on September 16, 2008, the same day as the bailout of AIG.

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Put this in your box of things you don't hear everyday: A Republican senator, a tea partier no less, is calling for the United States to loosen its connections with Israel. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) told ABC News this week that if it were up to him, the US would stop sending foreign aid to what most Republicans consider to be the nation's most important ally anywhere.

"I think they're an important ally, but I also think that their per capita income is greater than probably three-fourths of the rest of the world," Paul told ABC's Jonathan Karl. "Should we be giving free money or welfare to a wealthy nation? I don't think so."

Paul, best known as the man who promised to bring the tea party to Washington, didn't say he feels any differently toward Israel than his Republican (and most of his Democratic) colleagues. He just feels that as long as the nation is in the deep debt hole its in, it's time to turn of the cash spigot to the country that 2012 GOP contenders are flocking to in advance of primary season.

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At least two Interior Department offices are testing out iPads in an effort to increase productivity, and a third office is looking to acquire the coveted tablets. But iPads have proven vulnerabilities -- only two weeks ago, a duo was arrested for hacking into AT&T records and exposing 120,000 iPad accounts, including top government officials.

The department is still interested. "They're being used as replacements for laptops and blackberries," said Drew Malcomb, the Interior Department's chief of public affairs. "We see them as filling that need. They have a larger screen, the attachments are onboard and they have most of the capabilities of a laptop."

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At least two Interior Department offices are testing out iPads in an effort to increase productivity, and a third office is looking to acquire the coveted tablets. But iPads have proven vulnerabilities -- only two weeks ago, a duo was arrested for hacking into AT&T records and exposing 120,000 iPad accounts, including top government officials.

The department is still interested. "They're being used as replacements for laptops and blackberries," said Drew Malcomb, the Interior Department's chief of public affairs. "We see them as filling that need. They have a larger screen, the attachments are onboard and they have most of the capabilities of a laptop."

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The Obama Administration is quietly trumpeting the fact that a federal judge in Mississippi tossed out a lawsuit Thursday challenging the constitutionality of the health care reform law.

By definition, it's good news for the White House. But the judge in question didn't rule on the legal question that is at the heart of the constitutional challenges to the new law.

It was a strange suit, filed by the lieutenant governor of Mississippi, Phil Bryant, acting in his capacity as a civilian, along with several other individuals. And unlike the other challenges to the law, including the one by many state attorneys general, which allege that the law's individual mandate exceeds Congress' Commerce Clause powers, this lawsuit was brought on 10th Amendment grounds.

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U.S. In Talks Over Possible Mubarak Departure Reuters reports: "U.S. officials said on Thursday they were discussing with Egyptians different scenarios for a transition of power, including one in which President Hosni Mubarak leaves office immediately. 'That's one scenario,' said a senior Obama administration official who spoke on condition of anonymity. 'There are a number of scenarios, but (it is) wrong to suggest we have discussed only one with the Egyptians.'"

Obama's Day Ahead President Obama will receive the presidential daily briefing at 9:30 a.m. ET, and meet with senior advisers at 10 a.m. ET. He will hold a bilateral meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper at 2:10 p.m. ET. The two will hold an expanded bilateral meeting at 2:30 p.m. ET, and will hold a joint press availability at 3:10 p.m. ET.

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