TPM News

Gibbs: 'Every President Makes Mistakes, Including Barack Obama' White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said that President Obama will acknowledge that mistakes have been made during his first year in office. "The president is going to explain why he thinks the American people are angry and frustrated," said Gibbs, who also said that "every president makes mistakes, including Barack Obama."

Obama's Day Ahead: The State Of The Union President Obama and Vice President Biden will receive the presidential daily briefing at 9:30 a.m. ET. Obama will meet at 2 p.m. ET with senior advisers. At 9 p.m. ET, Obama will deliver his State of the Union address, to a joint session of Congress at the Capitol.

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Conservative new media figure Andrew Breitbart revealed last night on Hugh Hewitt's radio show that he pays a salary to James O'Keefe, the filmmaker who was charged yesterday in an alleged attempt to tamper witt the phones of Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-LA).

But Breitbart, who runs the Big Government site where O'Keefe's now-famous ACORN sting videos were posted, is maintaining that he had no "connection to" the incident at Landrieu's New Orleans office.

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Last night on The Daily Show Harvard professor and Congressional Oversight Panel chair Elizabeth Warren gave Jon Stewart a brief and cogent history of the American economy and laid out the stakes for the economic reform now being considered by congress.

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Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell (R) has learned a lesson from awkward State of the Union responses in years past, and tonight will offer his rebuttal to President Obama's speech in front of 300 people in the House of Delegates chamber.

McDonnell spokesman Tucker Martin told TPMDC that the newly inaugurated governor will speak surrounded by family, supporters, government officials and lawmakers who will be seated on chairs on the risers behind him.

That image - and likely applause - will be a stark contrast to Gov. Bobby Jindal's response to the Obama speech (not officially a State of the Union since he'd just taken office) last year and to the two other Virginians tasked with the response during George W. Bush's presidency.

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January 26, 2010: Key progressive leaders have offered rather tepid responses to the political stagnation on health care reform. But many liberals are not going out quietly. Progressive labor and community groups organized a march on Washington, D.C., today to demonstrate their frustration with the delay in implementing the health care legislation.

All photos by Jeff Malet/maletphoto.com






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Jeff Malet/maletphoto.com







Jeff Malet/maletphoto.com

Leading Democrats in the House still insist that "all options are on the table" to move ahead on health care. But for the first time since last Tuesday's special election in Massachusetts, it's clear that they're coalescing around the most widely discussed option: moving ahead with the Senate bill once it's clear that it will be changed through the filibuster-proof reconciliation process. Before they can move ahead, they need the Senate to make some real headway on their end of the bargain--and they're not getting the signs they need.

"I thought we could get the votes in the House to pass the [Senate] bill if fixes to the Senate bill can be done," House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-SC) told reporters today.

"That would be a good option as far as I'm concerned," said Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-IL), leader of the House progressives' health care task force. "I could support it. Reconciliation. Majority rule."

House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Henry Waxman (D-CA)--one of the key architect's of the House health care bill--gives it the high sign. "I think reconciliation's an appropriate way to proceed on reconciling the budget requirements," he said. "It's available to us. That was very specifically handled that way when we passed the budget."

The hang up, they now say, is not on their end, but that they first need a high sign from the Senate that the two chambers can work in lockstep.

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Three of the four young men charged in the alleged phone tampering attempt at Sen. Mary Landrieu's New Orleans office Monday were involved in the well-funded, opportunity-rich world of conservative campus journalism in recent years, a link that provides potential clues about how the men knew each other and why they came to hatch the alleged plot.

James O'Keefe, Joseph Basel, and Stan Dai each founded or led the alternative conservative newspapers on their respective college campuses.

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Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-LA) released the following statement today regarding the arrest of four men charged in the botched attempt to bug her office. Here's the full text:

"This is a very unusual situation and somewhat unsettling for me and my staff.  The individuals responsible have been charged with entering federal property under false pretenses for the purposes of committing a felony.  I am as interested as everyone else about their motives and purpose, which I hope will become clear as the investigation moves forward."

Richard Behney, an Indiana Tea Party activist and candidate for the Republican nomination for Senate against Democratic Sen. Evan Bayh, made a striking pronouncement at a meeting late last year of the "Evansville 2nd Amendment Patriots": That if new people don't get elected to Congress in 2010, he'll be getting out his guns to face down the American government.

"That's the beauty of this, folks. We can do it before it gets to guns," said Behney, in praise of the electoral process. "All right, our founders brought out the guns. When they showed up at Lexington and Concord, regular folks, farm boys, doctors, merchant men, and they said you ain't taking our stuff. They stood up to the most powerful army in the world, and they bought our freedom, literally with their blood. And we don't have to do that yet.

"I believe personally, we're at a crossroads. We have one last opportunity. And I believe 2010 is it. All right? And we can do it with our vote. And we can get new faces in, whether it's my face or not, I pray to God that I see new faces. And if we don't see new faces, I'm cleaning my guns and getting ready for the big show. And I'm serious about that, and I bet you are, too. But I know none of us want to go that far yet, and we can do it with our vote."

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There's a lot we still don't know about the four men implicated in the alleged attempt to tamper with Sen. Mary Landrieu's phones yesterday, but a little-known organization called the Pelican Institute appears to be key to the story.

Located at 400 Poydras St. in downtown New Orleans -- half a block from Landrieu's office at 500 Poydras St. -- Pelican describes itself as a state policy think tank dedicated to advancing "sound policies based on the principles of free enterprise, individual liberty, and limited government."

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