They've got muck; we've got rakes. TPM Muckraker

The white freakout over college students grappling with "the problem of whiteness” has just found a new target.

TPM previously reported on an Arizona State University course about "the problem of whiteness" that rose to national attention in January, prompting neo-Nazi types and white supremacists to threaten the professor teaching it.

The course also angered a white nationalist group, which put up flyers in the professor’s neighborhood labeling him as “Anti-White" and protested on campus to demand that the university administration fire him. Now that group, the National Youth Front, has turned its attention to a bulletin board campaign mentioning "white privilege" at Appalachian State University in Boone, N.C.

The bulletin board aimed to get passing students to reflect on whether they benefit from white, male, class, Christian, cisgender, heterosexual or able-bodied privilege. Strikingly, news of the bulletin board bubbled up through the conservative blogosphere and made its way to Fox News before it came across the National Youth Front's radar. The group set its sights on the "problem of whiteness" class after conservative media shined a spotlight on it, too.

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The white Oklahoma reserve sheriff's deputy charged with manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man has received threats and been harassed by the media in recent weeks, according to one of his attorneys.

Corbin Brewster, a member of the defense team representing Tulsa County Sheriff's Reserve Deputy Robert Bates, spoke about the threats and other details of the case in a phone interview Friday with TPM.

Brewster (whose father, attorney Clark Brewster, is pictured above with Bates) told TPM that both Bates and his lawyers have received threats referencing the man Bates killed, Eric Harris.

"Random anonymous phone calls which are, I’ll be honest, quite frightening in light of Mr. Harris -- I mean on his Facebook he claims gang affiliation with the Crips," he said. "So when you receive an anonymous threat involving reference to Mr. Harris, I think it’s particularly alarming."

Daniel Smolen, an attorney representing the Harris family, did not immediately respond on Friday afternoon to a request for comment from TPM about the allegations of gang affiliation. Bates told investigators after the shooting that on the day of the undercover operation, Harris was described to him as a convicted felon and a "bad son of a bitch" who had gang affiliations. News reports and statements from the sheriff's office have not identified Harris as a gang member or mentioned any affiliation with a gang.

Brewster also addressed questions about Bates' training that have surfaced in the Tulsa World newspaper. The paper reported, based on anonymous sources, that sheriff's office supervisors had falsified records for firearms and other training for Bates.

What follows is a partial transcript of TPM's conversation with Brewster that has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity.

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Oh what hell the Bundy Ranch hath wrought.

A dispute between the Bureau of Land Management and gold miners in Southwestern Oregon drew immediate comparisons to the 2014 standoff at Cliven Bundy's Nevada ranch as word of the fresh conflict wound its way through the blogosphere this week.

Many of the ingredients were the same: a disagreement over property rights, a remote locale and a band of armed activists committed to protecting the land owner's rights under the Constitution.

There's one key difference, though. In interviews with TPM and local news outlets, the players involved in the mining dispute have been adamant about preventing the situation in Oregon from escalating the way the standoff in Bunkerville, Nevada did. Despite their best intentions, the allure of an armed conflict with federal agents has still proved irresistible to self-styled militia members who flocked to the area from across the country to stir up trouble.

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Week after week, racist posts appear on Thee Rant, a blog for current or former New York City police officers: African Americans are called "apes;" a retired officer says one of the blessings of retirement is not having to work the Puerto Rican Day parade, with its "old obese tatted up women stuffed into outfits that they purchased or shoplifted at the local Kmart store; a Middle Eastern cab driver berated by an officer is termed a "third worlder" who should have his "head split open."

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An Arizona State University professor whose class on the "problem of whiteness" sparked backlash from conservatives and a total freakout from white supremacist groups received hundreds of hate emails and letters this winter, according to a police report obtained by TPM.

But one cryptic letter apparently stuck out to the police. It was filled with Bible verses and it described the recipient as a sinner. It contained vague references to "murder." The letter was hand-addressed to the professor and listed nothing more than the town of Switzer, W.V. and a zip code as its return address.

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