Gallup: Obama’s Speech Better Received Than Romney’s

Forty-three percent of Americans are more likely to vote for President Barack Obama in the wake of the Democratic National Convention — slightly more than those who were moved to vote for Mitt Romney after the Republican National Convention — while Obama’s speech also received higher marks than Romney’s, according to a new poll released Monday by Gallup.

Forty percent said they were more likely to vote for the GOP ticket of Romney and Paul Ryan after the RNC. Thirty-eight percent said the DNC made them less likely to vote for the president, while 20 percent said the convention made no difference on their vote.

Obama’s Thursday night speech earned a rating of either “excellent” or “good” by 43 percent of respondents, compared with 38 percent who said the same of Romney’s nomination address — the lowest rating given to a nominee’s convention speech since Gallup started tracking it in 1996.  

Neither candidate came close to matching the public’s favorable response to former President Bill Clinton’s speech on Wednesday night at the DNC.  Fifty-six percent rated Clinton’s speech — in which he formally nominated Obama for a second term — as “good” or “excellent.”

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tom Kludt is a reporter for Talking Points Memo based in New York City, covering media and national affairs. Originally from South Dakota, Tom joined TPM as an intern in late-2011 and became a staff member during the 2012 election. He can be reached at tom@talkingpointsmemo.com.
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