How Cutting-Edge Technology & Science Are Powering The Future TPM Idealab

BEIJING (AP) — The Jade Rabbit did not go quietly into that long lunar night.

Instead, China's troubled robotic moon rover — given voice by a government news agency — melodramatically pondered the meaning of its perhaps-fleeting existence, measured its contribution to humanity and, finally, said goodbye.

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(AP) — Those efforts to fight obesity in schools? Think younger. A new study finds that much of a child's "weight fate" is set by age 5, and that nearly half of kids who became obese by the eighth grade were already overweight when they started kindergarten.

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Shipments of crude oil by rail have exploded by more than 8,300 percent since 2006, effectively creating a new industry where one previously didn't exist while regulators scramble to figure out what they should do about it.

What's happening? As the chart indicates, the United States is producing increasing quantities of crude oil -- and the current pipeline infrastructure can't support it, leaving rail as the easiest alternative.

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MEXICO CITY (AP) — The number of Monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico plunged this year to its lowest level since studies began in 1993, leading experts to announce Wednesday that the insects' annual migration from the United States and Canada is in danger of disappearing.

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LONDON (AP) — Scientists say two of the deadliest pandemics in history were caused by strains of the same plague and warn that new versions of the bacteria could spark future outbreaks.

Researchers found tiny bits of DNA in the teeth of two German victims killed by the Justinian plague about 1,500 years ago. With those fragments, they reconstructed the genome of the oldest bacteria known.

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BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — Forget being sneezed on: Government scientists are deliberately giving dozens of volunteers the flu by squirting the live virus straight up their noses.

It may sound bizarre, but the rare type of research is a step in the quest for better flu vaccines. It turns out that how the body fends off influenza remains something of a mystery.

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BEIJING (AP) — China says its first lunar rover is experiencing mechanical problems, a rare setback for its burgeoning space program that in recent years has conducted space walks and placed a space station in orbit.

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BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — Forget being sneezed on: Government scientists are deliberately giving dozens of volunteers the flu by squirting the live virus straight up their noses.

It may sound bizarre, but the rare type of research is a step in the quest for better flu vaccines. It turns out that how the body fends off influenza remains something of a mystery.

Read More →

NEW YORK (AP) — Look around. Many of the gadgets you see drew inspiration from the original Mac computer.

Computers at the time typically required people to type in commands. Once the Mac came out 30 years ago Friday, people could instead navigate with a graphical user interface. Available options were organized into menus. People clicked icons to run programs and dragged and dropped files to move them.

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PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — NASA scientists are intrigued by a Martian rock resembling a jelly doughnut that seemed to appear out of nowhere.

The Opportunity rover earlier this month took an image of the rock, which was white around the outside and dark red in the middle. It was not present in earlier images of the same spot.

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