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Plain Sight Watch

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Let's remember back to early September, particularly the debate on September 7th. I flagged this little nugget at the time but it got very little attention. This was when Rick Perry was still a real candidate and the border fence and immigration in general were a big to-do between Romney and Perry.

But there was a key moment when Ron Paul was asked about the fence. He was against it, which is sensible enough. But his reason for being against it wasn't that sensible or even that sane. As I noted in my live blog, Paul's objection was that the fence could end up being used to "keep us in" after the financial collapse; specifically its real purpose might be to stop Americans from "leaving with their capital" after the breakdown of law and order in the USA.

Now you don't have to be that deeply steeped in the arcana of the militia movement and the extreme conspiratorial right to know where this kind of thinking comes from. It's right there with the FEMA concentration camps, the black helicopters, the post-economic collapse race war and the like.

Think about this. Paul's worried about the fence because after America's disastrous 100 year experiment with a central bank (the Fed) collapses in Mad Max style rioting in the streets, the government will be trying to keep good Americans from fleeing to Mexico with their capital. Over the fence. With their capital. To Mexico.

Here were Paul's actual words ...

I think this fence business is designed and may well be used against us and keep us in. In economic turmoil, the people want to leave with their capital. And there's capital controls and there's people control. So, every time you think of fence keeping all those bad people out, think about those fences maybe being used against us, keeping us in.

This wasn't twenty years ago. It was three months ago. And if you know the kind of mindset this stuff comes from, in some ways I find it more worrisome (though certainly less offensive) than the newsletters.