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This is hilarious. Unlike Ohio pols (particularly the Republican ones), the William McKinley presidential library in Canton is taking the renaming of Mt. McKinley in stride. Caitlin Cruz reports.

The Black Savage Myth And Conservative False Equivalence On 'Race Wars'

Aurin Squire on conservative media eager to compare the Virginia newscast shooting to the Charleston massacre: "This hyperbolic outcry is part of a longstanding practice of false equivalency—assuming that systemic racial violence towards African Americans and individual incidents of black people killing white people are one and the same."

Trump Says China Over And Over ...

TPM alum Ben Craw has taken one for mankind. He put together this mashup of Trump saying China ... a total of 234 separate times (Ben is scrupulous about never repeating a clip in a mashup). Watch:

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The Way of the Doofus Warrior

Yesterday we looked at how a doofus and blowhard, awash in derp, can nonetheless have a tactical genius that allows him to defeat all enemies again and again. I focused on an analogy I'm familiar with: increased mobility as a key to victory for Northern Civil War generals. But something funny happened in response to this post. Over almost 15 years of doing this, all of my best ideas and insights and certainly most of our best news tips have come from email exchanges with readers. But in all that time I'm not sure a post has struck the same chord - and a quite specific and technical one at that - with so many readers at once. A number of readers wrote in and said they agreed with the Sherman analogy but that a much tighter conceptual framework comes from a highly influential American military theorist who died almost 20 years ago, Colonel John Richard Boyd.

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The William T. Sherman Of Crazy

As some of you know, I've long been fascinated by the innovation of more mobile forms of warfare during the American Civil War. Out in the West, Grant and Sherman began streamlining and eventually even abandoning conventional supply lines to allow themselves figuratively and in some cases almost literally to run circles around their enemies. The Civil War fielded huge armies which needed constant replenishment of vast amounts of stuff - food, clothes, weapons, ammunition and more - which in turn required well organized supply lines, all of which limited mobility. More mobility is better than less of course. But in warfare, increased mobility reaches a point where it ceases to be an incremental or quantitative advantage and becomes a qualitative and transformational difference.

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